EXAMINING THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN PERCEIVED PARENTING STYLE AND ATTACHMENT IN DEAF ADULTS (A REPLICATION STUDY)

ID: 4018
Status: Completed
Start date: August 2018
End Date: September 2020

Description

The practice of replication of research is a rising yet controversial topic within the field of psychology due to researchers’ struggles to reproduce or replicate findings. The controversy of replication may stem from how researchers define “replication failures” or “successful replication” and statistical considerations. The purpose of this study was to expand current psychological perspectives on replication that emphasize significance testing by conducting a broader analysis of data trends in addition to statistical significance through a conceptual replication of Fedlan (2018). Fedlan (2018) explored the association between perceived parenting style, attachment style, and self-concept in deaf and hearing adults. The outcomes of the current study varied across these constructs. Although some conceptual trends were identified and supported, evident differences between studies occurred across analyses in areas of significance, direction, strength, and the nature of the effects. In view of sample heterogeneity and the effects of small and underpowered samples, the determination of replication outcomes remains debatable. The current study underlines the intricacies of replication from multiple viewpoints, which involves the importance of study methodology, the statistical considerations of small and underpowered samples, sample heterogeneity, the determination of replication outcomes, and the nuances involved in developing an appropriate threshold for “success” in replication studies.

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