Students Actively Engaged in Research

Research at Gallaudet University strives to involve students in ways that benefits their minds and also advances the pursuit of new understandings and knowledge. From serving as assistants for faculty investigators to the carrying out of their own study, students are major contributors in the vitality of campus research scholarship. With scientific inquiry often provoking more and more questions, and thereby revealing the complexity of our world, self-motivated students learn to challenge received information. Accordingly, many academic programs have classes that require research projects as a final project or as the focus of the entire course. Through active inquiry, students get a chance to apply theories and knowledge from their classes in a way that helps them to make connections to real situations and practice. Such critical approach to thinking can propel a deeper insight into their chosen field—and solidify their foundation for a promising career in the knowledge-based fields.

Engaging students in research benefits not only them, but the professional fields as well. Young minds may approach problems in new ways. Gaining the insight of younger Deaf and hard of hearing people is essential to many topics of concern to Gallaudet in particular. Across the university, there are a growing number of "hot spots" of student researchers working on studies from the physical sciences to social sciences to deafness-related disciplines. Student research assistants play vital roles in collecting responses from diverse participants, analyzing raw data, and presenting findings. Across the university, there are a growing number of "hot spots" of student researchers working on studies from the physical sciences to social sciences to deafness-related disciplines. The university encourages student involvement in research activity through graduate assistantships, hiring under external grants, and direct funding of student research. In addition, research internships are being made available to students, through various departments such as the Interpretation Department. One promising development is the extent of student-initiated, student-led research activity. At the pinnacle of student contribution to knowledge is the doctoral dissertation; a list of dissertations completed by Gallaudet students in FY 2018 is shown below.

Dissertations completed in FY 2018

Aftar, N.F. (2018) Parents' perspectives of their deaf child's school experiences in Malaysia: a phenomenological qualitative study (Doctoral dissertation). Gallaudet University, Washington, DC.

Caverly, C. (2017). Pulse check: An exploratory study of the Experiences of Parents of Deaf Children with Disabilities (Doctoral dissertation). Gallaudet University, Washington, DC.

Clark, L. (2018). The interactive courtroom: The Deaf defendant watches how the speaker is identified for each turn-at-talk during a team interpreted event (Doctoral dissertation). Gallaudet University, Washington, DC.

Courtney, R.E. (2017). The interaction between personality and exercise in predicting perceived stress (Doctoral dissertation). Gallaudet University, Washington, DC.

Dicus, D.L. (2018). Towards corpus-based sign language interpreting studies: A critical look at the relationship between linguistics data and software tools (Doctoral dissertation). Gallaudet University, Washington, DC.

Dowtin, L.L. (2018). The Therapeutic Power of Play: Play Therapy Training Experiences of Mental Health Professionals with Deaf Clients (Doctoral dissertation). Gallaudet University, Washington, DC.

Dziura, J. (2017) Psychological well-being, acceptance of disability, and perceived social support in U.S. military veterans with acquired hearing loss (Doctoral dissertation). Gallaudet University, Washington, DC.

Fitzmaurice, S. B. (2018) An investigation of administrators' and teachers' perception of educational interpreters' role in K-12 education: A case study (Doctoral dissertation). Gallaudet University, Washington, DC.

Galloza-Carrero, A. (2018). Deaf Latino children's attention and language acquisition: A longitudinal study (Doctoral dissertation). Gallaudet University, Washington, DC.

Gamache Jr, K.E. (2018) Investigating the impact of ASL proficiency levels on ASL-English interpretation (Doctoral dissertation). Gallaudet University, Washington, DC.

Guardino, D.L. (2017). Certified Deaf Interpreters' psychological well-being and coping mechanisms in medical situations (Doctoral dissertation). Gallaudet University, Washington, DC.

Hom, M.J. (2018). Deaf Latino students: a grounded theory of educators' narratives (Doctoral dissertation). Gallaudet University, Washington, DC.

Kartheiser, G. (2018). The Neuroplasticity of Spatial Working Memory in Signed Language Processing. (Doctoral dissertation). Gallaudet University, Washington, DC.

Kozak, L.V. (2018) Phonological processing by bimodal bilingual children (Doctoral dissertation). Gallaudet University, Washington, DC.

Miner, A. (2018). The use and effectiveness of situated learning in American Sign Language-English interpreter education (Doctoral dissertation). Gallaudet University, Washington, DC.

Opsahl, L.N. (2017). Have you talked about it? A descriptive phenomenological analysis of Deaf women's experiences of sexual assault disclosure (Doctoral dissertation). Gallaudet University, Washington, DC.

Previ, D. (2018). Parent-Child Interaction Therapy Dyadic Parent Child Interaction Coding System (DPICS): Interrater reliability with live versus video coding (Doctoral dissertation). Gallaudet University, Washington, DC.

Sheneman, N. (2018). Does extralinguistic knowledge really matter? An examination of the impact of Deaf interpreters' personal and professional experience on cancer-related translated texts (Doctoral dissertation). Gallaudet University, Washington, DC.

Wright, G.W. (2018). The influence of hearing loss on clinically concerning behaviors in children with congenital cytomegalovirus (Doctoral dissertation). Gallaudet University, Washington, DC.