Science, Technology, and Mathematics

Research challenges faculty and students to transform learning, observations, and ideas into new solutions and products. This unit has active research in nanotechnology, remote sensing, limnology, pharmacognosy, organic synthesis, and biomedical areas. Mentored research, university collaborations, and internships provide students experience for work, advanced degrees, and medical/pharmaceutical professional careers.


Assessing the effectiveness of the Anacostia River tunnel in reduction of eutrophication

ID: 3588
Status: Ongoing
Start date: February 2018
End Date: January 2020

Description

The Anacostia River is among the most polluted tributaries in Chesapeake Bay. With substantial algal blooms and bacterial contamination, it has placed those who recreate on the water at considerable health risk. A recently completed, and soon to be fully implemented multi-billion dollar infrastructure project, has been completed to retain and divert sewage and storm water effluent, with the goal of improving water quality in this important river. This project will address the hypothesis that the diversion of water and its associated nutrients will lead to an improvement in water quality, a shift in the community composition of phytoplankton species, and a reduction in sewage-associated bacteria. Building on a considerable body of work on baseline conditions over the past few years, this project will bring new seasonal water column measurements, enclosure enrichment studies, and molecular approaches to determine if, indeed, a success story can be written. We will use established relationships with the Anacostia Riverkeeper and the Anacostia Waterfront Trust to communicate with community groups via meetings, social media, and the local press, and implement a citizen science program to allow for rapid response regarding water safety.

Principal investigators

Additional investigators

Priorities addressed

Funding sources

Products

Gleich, S. (2019) Nutrient effects on phytoplankton community composition in the eutrophic Anacostia River and a focus on diatom physiology. Masters Thesis. University of Maryland, College Park.

Mitchell, T., Officer, R, Robinson, A, Solomon, C.M. (2019). Post-tunnel analysis of nitrogen dynamics in the Anacostia River. Presented at Department of Science, Technology and Mathematics Presentations, Gallaudet University, Washington, DC.

Officer, R, Arora, G., Solomon, C.M. (2019). Impact of pre- and post-tunnel implication on microbial and community diversity. Presented at Department of Science, Technology and Mathematics Presentations, Gallaudet University, Washington, DC.

Officer, R., Mitchell, T., Arora, G. and C.M. Solomon (2020). Pre- and post-tunnel comparison of nitrogen and microbial community dynamics of Anacostia River, D.C. Ocean Sciences Meeting: Association for the Sciences of Limnology and Oceanography. San Diego, CA.

Peck, C., Orozco, M., Gliech, S., Lin, M., Glibert, P.M., Solomon, C.M. (2018). Influence of different N, P and Si additions on urea utilization pathways in an Anacostia River phytoplankton community. Presented at End of Summer Internship Presentations, Gallaudet University, Washington, DC.

Peck, C., Orozco, M., Gliech, S., Lin, M., Glibert, P.M., Solomon, C.M. Influence of different N, P and Si additions on urea utilization pathways in an Anacostia River phytoplankton community. Maryland Monitoring Council Forum; Lithicum, MD. December 2018.

Solomon C.M. (2019). Urea uptake and urease activity in Chesapeake Bay. In: Glibert, P.M., M. Altabet, J. Montoya and D. McGillicuddy (eds), The Sea, Volume 18: The Current and Future Ocean: Advancing Science from Plankton to Whales. Celebrating the Contributions of James J. McCarthy. Journal of Marine Research 77; Supplement. Yale Univ. Press.

Solomon, C.M, Glibert, P.M, & Gleich, S. (2018, December) Eutrophication status and expectations for recovery of the Anacostia River. Maryland Water Monitoring Council Annual Conference. Linthicum, MD.

Solomon, C.M., Jackson, M. & Glibert, P.M. (2019) Chesapeake Bay's "forgotten" Anacostia River: eutrophication and nutrient reduction measures Environ Monit Assess 191: 265. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10661-019-7437-9


Bismuth Telluride and Molybdenum Disulfide Nanomaterials

ID: 3484
Status: Ongoing
Start date: October 2016
End Date: October 2020

Description

This project aims to develop a protocol for large scale synthesis of molybdenum disulfide and bismuth telluride nanomaterials using the chemical exfoliation method.

Principal investigators

Additional investigators

Priorities addressed

Funding sources

Products

Gutierrez, J.; Sabila, P.; Huber, T. Bismuth Telluride (Bi2Te3). (2017, August). Lecture presentation at Harvard University, Boston, MA.

Lalescu, J.; Gutierrez, J.; Sabila, P. (2017, Summer) Introduction to ASL and Deaf Culture. Presented at Harvard University, Boston, MA.

Lalescu, J.; Gutierrez, J.; Sabila, P. (2017, Summer) Introduction to ASL and Deaf Culture. Presented at Howard University, Washington, DC.

Lalescu, J.; Sabila, P. (2017, August). Exfoliation of Molybdenum Disulfide (MoS2) using n-butyllithium. Lecture presentation at Harvard University, Boston, MA.

Mbochwa, C., Sabila, P., Snyder, H. D., Huber, T & Johnson, S. (2016, October). The Effects of Reaction time and Solvent System on MoS2 Exfoliation. Poster presented at the 2016 Undergraduate Research Symposium at the University of Maryland-Baltimore campus, Baltimore, MD.


Computational Investigation of Ataxia Disease-Causing Mutations

ID: 3612
Status: Ongoing
Start date: February 2017
End Date: October 2019

Description

Friedreich's ataxia is an inherited disease that causes progressive damage to the nervous system. Initial symptoms include poor coordination and often times it causes scoliosis or heart disease and diabetes. Currently, there is no cure for Friedreich's Ataxia. Our research aims to understand how DNA variations cause the disease. There are numerous fast computational methods that can be used for this purpose. However, they are not accurate enough and cannot be relied on. We hypothesize that if the current fast methods can be used in conjunction with smart conformational search, the accuracy can be significantly increased. We use replica-exchange molecular dynamics to generate different conformations of the frataxin protein and then use those conformational with current fast methods. After that we compare our results with known experimental values and iteratively improve the conformational search until we develop a method that is both efficient (fast) and accurate. Once the method is completed, it will be applicable to studying other inherited monogenic (caused by single DNA mutation) diseases.

Principal investigators

Additional investigators

Priorities addressed


Computer Simulations to Understand Disease Mechanisms

ID: 3390
Status: Ongoing
Start date: September 2016

Description

This project utilizes multiscale computer simulation methods to understand Mendelian disease mechanisms at the molecular level. Computer simulations use the tools of math and physics to solve problems in chemistry, biology, and medicine. Mendalian diseases are monogenic disorders caused by a variation in one gene and sometimes run in families. In general, these are rare genetic disorders with no cure. Our approach is to understand how a single variation in a single gene can cause a disease at the molecular level. This is done by simulations of the natural and variant proteins and comparing various properties. Once we understand the effects of single variations, our next step is to possibly design drugs to reverse the harmful effects. Currently, computer simulations are being run in our HPC Limulus supercomputer, as well as Clemson Palmetto Supercomputing cluster through our collaboration.

Principal investigators

Additional investigators

Priorities addressed

Products

Kucukkal, T. G. (2017). A Whone New Virtual World: Computational Chemistry. Presented at Gallaudet University Research Expo, Washington, DC.

Kucukkal, T. G. (2017). Effects of Rett Syndrome Mutations on MeCP2 Stability and Binding to DNA. Presented at International Conference on GEnomic Medicine, Baltimore, MD.


Designing Serious Games for Chemistry

ID: 3613
Status: Ongoing
Start date: September 2017
End Date: October 2020

Description

Blended learning techniques such as game-based learning has always been viewed as an effective tool in various levels from grade school to higher education. However, despite the popularity of gaming in youth and its potential in student engagement and motivation, it has not been exploited extensively particularly in higher education. With these in mind, we develop 'serious games' to be used in chemistry (and possibly other) courses to increase student engagement and motivation, and eventually the learning. Recently, we designed the "PChem Challenge Game" with rather ancient 'snakes and ladders' game mechanics in mind, but transforming it into a unique blend of pure luck and knowledge. The game now is part of the curriculum at Gallaudet and currently, we are testing its efficacy in different institutions across the country. Similarly, the project is being extended to other courses at Gallaudet. An unexpected benefit of the approach has been that it helps improve students' technical ASL since the game requires players to read questions for other players and provide clues when needed.

Principal investigators

Additional investigators

Priorities addressed


Effectiveness of mentoring in science research

ID: 2611
Status: Ongoing
Start date: October 2014
End Date: August 2030

Description

Disabled individuals, women, and cultural and ethnic minorities continue to be underrepresented in STEM. Research has shown that mentoring increases success for underrepresented individuals. Available mentoring survey instruments have all been developed for the majority population and were not intended to capture factors for successful mentoring of underrepresented groups. In this project, we are developing and validating a next-generation mentoring survey drawing from prior mentoring instruments, and incorporating capital theory and critical race theory. From critical race theory, this survey includes community cultural wealth, which is thought to be instrumental to the success of individuals from minority communities. Our survey focuses on mentoring relationships between Deaf and hard of hearing protégés and their research advisors. From the pilot survey results we have identified three segregating factors. The first two factors contain traditional capitals. The third factor, community cultural wealth, was well conferred when Deaf protégés were paired with mentors who were either Deaf or had knowledge of American Sign Language and Deaf culture. This next-generation survey is geared for improving the success of underrepresented groups in STEM and can be used for hypothesis testing or for generating constructive feedback for mentors. Our results so far suggest that cultural awareness training may be a strategy for improving mentoring effectiveness.

Principal investigators

Additional investigators

Priorities addressed

Funding sources

Products

Braun, D. C., Clark, M. D., Marchut, A. E., Solomon, C. M., Majocha, M., Davenport, Z., et al. (2018). Welcoming Deaf Students into STEM: Recommendations for University Science Education. CBE-Life Sciences Education, 17(3), es10. http://doi.org/10.1187/cbe.17-05-0081

Braun, D.C. (2019, October). Welcoming Deaf Students into STEM: Recommendations and Research. Presented at Opening the Pathway Conference; Rochester Institute of Technology (NY).

Braun, D.C. (2020, August). Mentoring Deaf Students in UREs: The Value of Cultural Competency. Presented at Cultivating Scientific Curiosity; BIOME Institute.

Braun, DC, Gormally C, Clark MD. (2017). The Deaf Mentoring Survey: A Community Cultural Wealth Framework for Measuring Mentoring Effectiveness with Underrepresented Students. CBE-Life Sciences Education,16(1):10.

Braun, DC, Gormally C, Clark MD. (2017, June). Applications of the Deaf Mentoring Survey to Medical Education. Presented at the Association of Medical Professionals with Hearing Loss (AMPHL), Rochester, NY.

Braun, DC. (2017, June). Best Practices to Mentor and Collaborate with Deaf and Hard of Hearing Scientists. Presented at the Rochester Summer Research Training Institute (RSRTI), Rochester, NY.

Majocha, M., Davenport, Z., Braun, D. C., & Gormally, C. (2018). “Everyone Was Nice…But I Was Still Left Out”: An Interview Study About Deaf Interns’ Research Experiences in STEM †. Journal of Microbiology & Biology Education, 19(1). http://doi.org/10.1128/jmbe.v19i1.1381


Image processing for NASA applications

ID: 1040
Status: Ongoing
Start date: May 2002
End Date: January 2020

Description

Software is being developed to improve geolocating Corona spy satellite photos from the 1960s. The winter and spring (2014) studies were done of how the accuracy of mapping depended on the starting point for optimization software. Five hundred good starting points were identified for each frame of a Corona image, and automated searches were done to minimize mapping error. It was expected that these searches would identify a few local minima where the search software would get stuck and some of the searches would find a true minimum error state. It was discovered that the lowest minimum error corresponded to the 30m resolution of the images used for calibrating the mapping. Other minima were scattered over the parameter space instead of clustering at a few points. At the suggestion of a National Aeronautic Space Administration colleague, mapping points were recalibrated on higher resolution imagery over several months. The starting point studies need to be repeated. Work continues on providing and updating data resources for the www.oceanmotion.org educational website. The updates are typically done twice a year.

Principal investigators

Priorities addressed


Incorporating Original Research into Undergraduate Chemistry Curriculum

ID: 3615
Status: Ongoing
Start date: September 2017
End Date: October 2020

Description

Incorporating original research into undergraduate chemistry courses is still in infancy despite the fact that it has a great potential to promote the 21st century skills such as collaboration, critical thinking, and problem-solving. Integrating research into classroom teaching also expected to stir deep learning through inquiry as well as leading to better student engagement. Within the context of this project, we develop and test original research projects suitable for undergraduate teaching at various levels. One such project was applied in a first semester physical chemistry course in Fall 2017. Besides longer-term benefits described above, the original research incorporated in the classroom sparked an immediate interest in pursuing further research in one of the students. Also, we report the challenges such as finding a suitable research problem, adjusting the difficulty and dividing the work evenly among students. Currently, we are in collaboration or looking for collaborating with faculty in science, math and computer fields to develop similar original research to be incorporated in their classrooms.

Principal investigators

Additional investigators

Priorities addressed

Funding sources

Products

Kucukkal, T. G. (2017, July). Integrating Original Research in Undergraduate Physical Chemistry Curriculum. Presented at the meeting of Counsel on Undergraduate Research Biennial Conference, Arlington, VA.


Investigations of the effect of catalyst loading on cross-metathesis reaction

ID: 1993
Status: Ongoing
Start date: October 2012
End Date: December 2020

Description

Investigations were carried out using various cross-metathesis catalysts to determine effect of catalyst concentration on the reaction. This has a potential application in chemical, polymer, and pharmaceutical industries, as it could potentially lead to reduced cost of production.

Principal investigators

Priorities addressed

Funding sources

Products

Sabila, P. S. (2015). Styrene cross-metathesis using low catalyst concentrations. Universal Journal of Chemistry, 3(3), 87-90.


Partnership in reduced dimensional materials (PRDM): Preparation of molybdenum disulfide nanomaterials

ID: 1991
Status: Ongoing
Start date: October 2012
End Date: December 2020

Description

The project worked on developing strategies for the preparation of molybdenum disulfide nanomaterials, which have potential applications in fabrication of electronic devices and semiconductors. Two approaches for synthesis of nanomaterials were explored. The first strategy was successful in depositing molybdenum disulfide films on silicon wafers. The resulting products were analyzed using a Scanning Electron Microscope, which produces images of a sample by scanning it with a focused beam of electrons and contains information about the sample's surface composition and features. Further analyses are done using Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy and Profilometer.

Principal investigators

Additional investigators

Funding sources

Products

Gallaudet Office of Communications and Public Relations. (2012). Nanotechnology helps generate interest in science class, careers. On The Green. Retrieved from http://www.gallaudet.edu/news/nanoexpress_2012.html

Gallaudet Office of Communications and Public Relations. (2012). NSF grant to enhance research at Gallaudet, other universities. On The Green. Retrieved from https://www.gallaudet.edu/news/nsf_grant_enhance_nanotech.html

Gallaudet Office of Communications and Public Relations. (2013). Department of Science, Technology, and Mathematics works to narrow gap for Deaf students in STEM fields. On The Green. Retrieved from http://www.gallaudet.edu/news/stem_mgl_internships.html

Houghton, M., Snyder, H. D., & Sabila, P. S. (2015, August). Growth, characterization and exfoliation of molybdenum sulfide (MoS2) nanomaterials. Presented at the Cornell Center for Materials Research Symposium, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY.


Partnerships for material research (PREM)

ID: 1565
Status: Ongoing
Start date: October 2010
End Date: September 2020

Description

This research is on nanotechnology-related projects at Howard University. Students were able to use lithography to prepare nanotechnology samples. They also had hands-on experience with various instrument techniques, including Scanning Electron Microscopy, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy, FTIR spectroscopy, and mass spectrometry. The students synthesized a variety of organic precursors that will be used for the synthesis of nanomaterials by chemical vapor deposition method. Three Gallaudet students participated in an internship under the supervision of Dr. Sabila. This internship also tested a new template that could be used for future research collaborations between Gallaudet and other universities where Deaf and hard of hearing Gallaudet students work in a hearing research environment.

Principal investigators

Additional investigators

Priorities addressed

Funding sources

Products

Mbochwa, C., Habtemichael, A., & Sabila, P. (2014, October). Growth of molybdenum disulfide films on silicon wafers. Presented at the Summer Undergradute Research Symposium, University of Maryland-Baltimore County, Baltimore, MD.

Mbochwa, C., Habtemichael, A., &Sabila, P. (2014, September). Growth of molybdenum disulfide films on silicon wafers. Presented at the meeting of the Center for Integrated Quantum Materials, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA.

Rupnik, G. (2012) Part C:Synthesis of N-Methoxy β-ketoimines; Precursors for nanomaterial synthesis by MOCVD (metal organic chemical vapor deposition). Poster presented at the Undergraduate Student Research Symposium, University of Maryland Baltimore County, Catonsville, MD.

Sabila, P. (2012). Gallaudet University chemistry majors gain nanotechnology skills in summer internship at Howard University. On the Green Publication. Retrieved from http://www.gallaudet.edu/News/Chemistry_internships_at_Howard.html

Van Wey, J. (2011). Part A: Synthesis of N-Alkyl precursors for nanomaterial synthesis by MOCVD (metal-organic chemical vapor deposition). Poster presented at John Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD.

Van Wey, J. (2011). Part A: Synthesis of N-Alkyl precursors for nanomaterial synthesis by MOCVD (metal-organic chemical vapor deposition). Poster presented at the Undergraduate Student Research Symposium, University of Maryland Baltimore County, Catonsville, MD.

Zhou Yang, F. (2012). Part B: Synthesis of N-Alkyl precursors for nanomaterial synthesis by MOCVD (metal-organic chemical vapor deposition). Poster presented at John Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD.

Zhou Yang, F. (2012). Part B: Synthesis of N-Alkyl precursors for nanomaterial synthesis by MOCVD (metal-organic chemical vapor deposition). Poster presented at the Undergraduate Student Research Symposium, University of Maryland Baltimore County, Catonsville, MD.


Population genetics of connexin 26 deafness

ID: 765
Status: Ongoing
Start date: January 2010
End Date: January 2030

Description

The researchers aim to explore three explanations for the high genetic prevalence and mutational diversity of deafness-causing GJB2 mutations in the North American population, as well as the association of specific GJB2 mutations within ethnic groups. One possibility is mutation-selection equilibrium: novel GJB2 mutations are perhaps being introduced at the same rate that mutations in the gene pool are being eliminated. Evidence showing a mutational hotspot at GJB2, particularly for deletion mutations, would provide support for this hypothesis. A second explanation is linguistic homogamy, meaning in this case that culturally Deaf individuals have actively sought mates with compatible fluency in signed languages. This mate-selection phenomenon may have begun ~200 years ago with the introduction of signed language in residential schools for the Deaf. A third possibility is that of balancing selection. Unrelated to studying deafness, Tran van Nhieu, Clair et al. have shown in tissue culture experiments that Shigella flexneri requires GJB2 connexons for egression into the intestinal epithelia, raising the possibility that the three common GJB2 deletions could confer resistance to Shigella dysentery. This project studies all three of these hypotheses.

Principal investigators

Additional investigators

Priorities addressed

Funding sources

Products

Braun, D. C. (2015, September). Population genetics of Cx26 deafness: Frequency, mutability, history and geography. Presented at the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders Seminar, Bethesda, MD.

Braun, D. C., Craft, E. A., Herold, B. K., Arnos, K. S., Tekin, M., & Pandya, A. (2014, October). Does genetic hypermutability contribute to the prevalence of connexin 26 deafness? Poster presented at the meeting of the American Society for Human Genetics, San Diego, CA.

Braun, D. C., Jain, S., Epstein, E., Greenwald, B.H., Herold, B., & Gray, M. Deaf intermarriage does not increase the prevalence of deafness alleles. bioRxiv 2020. doi: 10.1101/2020.04.09.034728

Jain, S., Epstein, E., & Braun, D. C. (2014, October). Linguistic homogamy explains the recent increase in phenotypic deafness, but does not predict an increase in frequency of deafness alleles. Poster presented at the Undergraduate Research Symposium in the Chemical and Biological Sciences, Baltimore, MD.

McBride, C., Chin, J., & Braun, D. C. (2014, October). Practical and inexpensive DNA fingerprinting for undergraduate science majors and high school students. Poster presented at the Undergraduate Research Symposium in the Chemical and Biological Sciences, Baltimore, MD.


REU Accessible Information and Communications Technologies

ID: 3610
Status: Ongoing
Start date: January 2018
End Date: February 2022

Description

The Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) Site on Accessible Information and Communication Technology (AICT) provides undergraduate participants with research experiences on projects that enhance accessibility of information and communication technologies, such as mobile phones or streaming videos for consumers who are deaf, hard of hearing, or deaf-blind (DHHDB). The participants will collaborate with DHHDB peers and mentors on a research project for 10 weeks. The diverse teams provide students with the experience and knowledge to recognize the range and complexity of accessibility challenges in accessing information and communication technology and to evaluate the efficacy of proposed solutions in a unique research environment. DHHDB students are extremely underrepresented in academics at the graduate level especially in STEM. The AICT REU site creates a critically needed pipeline of these students for graduate school and encourages them to participate in undergraduate and graduate programs in accessible information and communications technology. Each research project addresses unsolved accessibility challenges for deaf, hard of hearing or deaf-blind consumers in using existing information and communication technology that undergraduate researchers can easily understand, analyze and solve. The inclusion of undergraduate and faculty researchers who have aural disabilities increases accessibility and usability of information and communication technologies. The interactive and personal nature of the research projects provides a link between research and practice, and a diverse, inclusive and collaborative research experience for the participants. They will learn to create and disseminate their research outcomes through seminar training and participation in college and institutional conferences. The AICT REU Site website (http://accessiblemultimedia.com) provides additional information.

Principal investigators

Additional investigators

Priorities addressed

Funding sources

Products

Bragg, D. K., Kushalnagar, R.S. and Ladner R. E. (2018). Designing an Animated Character System for American Sign Language. Proceedings of the 20th International ACM SIGACCESS Conference on Computers and Accessibility – ASSETS '18. 22 October, Galway, Ireland. ACM Press.

Bragg, D., Morris, M. R., Vogler, C., Kushalnagar, R., Huenerfauth, M., & Kacorri, H. (2020). Sign Language Interfaces: Discussing the Field’s Biggest Challenges. Extended Abstracts of the 2020 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, 1–5. https://doi.org/10.1145/3334480.3381053

Datta, P., Jakubowicz, P., Vogler, C., & Kushalnagar, R. (2020). Readability of Punctuation in Automatic Subtitles (pp. 195–201). https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-58805-2_23

Jain, D., Franz, R., Findlater, L., Cannon, J., Kushalnagar, R.S. and Froehlich, J.E. (2018). Towards Accessible Conversations in a Mobile Context for People who are Deaf and Hard of Hearing. Proceedings of the 20th International ACM SIGACCESS Conference on Computers and Accessibility – ASSETS '18. 22 October, Galway, Ireland. ACM Press.

Jain, Dhruv and Chinh, Bonnie and Findlater, Leah and Kushalnagar, Raja and Froehlich, Jon. Exploring Augmented Reality Approaches to Real-Time Captioning: A Preliminary Autoethnographic Study, Proceedings of the 2018 ACM Conference Companion Publication on Designing Interactive Systems, 2018. doi:10.1145/3197391.3205404

Kushalnagar, R. and Kushalnagar, K. (2018). SubtitleFormatter: Making Subtitles Easier to Read for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Viewers on Personal Devices. Proceedings of the Computers Helping People with Special Needs – ICCHP 2018. 14 July, Vienna, Austria. Springer-Verlag. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-94277-3_35

Kushalnagar, R.S. and Behm, G.W. (2018). A Transition Community for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Students in Engineering Programs. Proceedings of the 125th ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition. 24 June, Salt Lake City, UT. ASEE Conferences. https://peer.asee.org/29742

Kushalnagar, R.S., Behm, G. W., Wolfe, K.W., Yeung, P., Dingman, B., Ali, S., Glasser, A., and Ryan, C. (2018). RTTD-ID: Tracked Captions with Multiple Speakers for Deaf Students. Proceedings of the 125th ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition. 24 June, Salt Lake City, UT. ASEE Conferences. https://peer.asee.org/30945

Santhalingam, P. S., Du, Y., Wilkerson, R., Hosain, A. A., Zhang, D., Pathak, P., Rangwala, H., & Kushalnagar, R. (2020). Expressive ASL Recognition using Millimeter-wave Wireless Signals. 2020 17th Annual IEEE International Conference on Sensing, Communication, and Networking (SECON), 1–9. https://doi.org/10.1109/SECON48991.2020.9158441

Santhalingam, P. S., Hosain, A. A., Zhang, D., Pathak, P., Rangwala, H., & Kushalnagar, R. (2020). mmASL. Proceedings of the ACM on Interactive, Mobile, Wearable and Ubiquitous Technologies, 4(1), 1–30. https://doi.org/10.1145/3381010

Wojtanowski, Gabriella; Gilmore, Colleen; Seravalli, Barbra; Fargas, Kristen; Vogler, Christian; Kushalnagar, Raja. (2020). "Alexa, Can You See Me?" Making Individual Personal Assistants for the Home Accessible to Deaf Consumers. http://hdl.handle.net/10211.3/215984


Synthesis of bismuth telluride nanomaterials

ID: 2551
Status: Ongoing
Start date: May 2015
End Date: August 2024

Description

To synthesize nanomaterials of bismuth telluride using chemical exfoliation method. We have successfully used chemical exfoliation to prepare molybdenum disulfide nanomaterials and films. We wanted to see if the same approach could be applied to bulk bismuth telluride to prepared thin films (2-dimensional materials). Bismuth telluride has been shown to exhibit interesting thermoelectric properties that convert heat to electricity. The goal of this project is to design a method for producing bismuth telluride films on silicon wafers. The films will be analyzed using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), optical microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. We are also interested in studying the depth and density of deposited bismuth telluride films on silicon wafers.

Principal investigators

Additional investigators

Priorities addressed

Funding sources

Products

Marceaux, B., Snyder, H. D., Sabila, P. S., & Huber, T. (2015, August). Exfoliation of Bismuth Telluride (Bi2Te3). Presented at the Centre for Information Quality Management Research Convocation, MIT, Boston, MA.


Scholarship and creative activity

2018

Abraham T. Glasser, Kesavan R. Kushalnagar & Raja S. Kushalnagar. (2017). Deaf, Hard of Hearing, and Hearing perspectives on using Automatic Speech Recognition in Conversation. In 19th International ACM SIGACCESS Conference on Computers and Accessibility – ASSETS '17. 22 October, Baltimore, MD, USA: ACM Press. https://doi.org/10.1145/3132525.3134781

Abraham T. Glasser, Kesavan R. Kushalnagar & Raja S. Kushalnagar. (2017). Feasibility of Using Automatic Speech Recognition with Voices of Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Individuals. Presented at the 19th International ACM SIGACCESS Conference on Computers and Accessibility – ASSETS '17. 26 October, Baltimore, MD, USA: ACM Press. https://doi.org/10.1145/3132525.3134819

Danielle K. Bragg, Raja S. Kushalnagar and Richard E. Ladner. (2018). Designing an Animated Character System for American Sign Language. Presented at the 20th International ACM SIGACCESS Conference on Computers and Accessibility – ASSETS '18, Galway, Ireland. ACM Press.

Dhruv Jain, Bonnie Chinh, Raja Kushalnagar, Leah Findlater and Jon E. Frohlich. (2018). Exploring Augmented Reality Approaches to Real-Time Captioning: A Preliminary Autoethnographic Study. Presented at the 12th ACM SIGCHI Conference on Designing Interactive Systems - DIS 2018. 9 June, Hong Kong, CN. ACM Press. https://doi.org/10.1145/3197391.3205404

Jain, D.; Franz,R., Findlater,L.; Cannon,J.; Kushalnagar, R. and Froehlich, J (2018). Towards Accessible Conversations in a Mobile Context for People who are Deaf and Hard of Hearing. Presemted at the 20th International ACM SIGACCESS Conference on Computers and Accessibility – ASSETS '18. 22 October, Galway, Ireland. ACM Press.

Kushalnagar, R. and Behm, G. (2018). A Transition Community for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Students in Engineering Programs.Presented at the n 125th ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition. 24 June, Salt Lake City, UT. ASEE Conferences. https://peer.asee.org/29742

Kushalnagar, R. and Kushalnagar, K. (2018). SubtitleFormatter: Making Subtitles Easier to Read for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Viewers on Personal Devices. Presented at the Computers Helping People with Special Needs – ICCHP 2018. 14 July, Vienna, Austria. Springer-Verlag. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-94277-3_35

Kushalnagar,R.; Behm,G., Wolfe,K.,Yeung, P., Dingman, B., Ali,S., Glasser, A. and Ryan, C. (2018). RTTD-ID: Tracked Captions with Multiple Speakers for Deaf Students. Presented at the 125th ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition. 24 June, Salt Lake City, UT. ASEE Conferences. https://peer.asee.org/30945

2018

Halpern, J., Huber, T., Sinex, S., Johnson, S., Sabila, P., & Mbochwa, C. (2018). Building a Dynamic University-Community College Partnership: The Second Decade of a Broad, Mutually Beneficial Materials Science Collaboration. MRS Advances, 3(12), 637-642. doi:10.1557/adv.2018.203

Halpern,J.; Huber, T.; Sinex, S.; Johnson, S.; and Sabila,P. (2017 November). Building a Dynamic University-Community College Partnership: The Second Decade of a Broad, Mutually Beneficial Materials Science Collaboration. Symposium at Community College and University Partnerships as Catalysts for Promoting Materials Science Education at 2017 MRS, Boston, MA.

2016

Arora, G. (2016) Genome Solver On-the-Go: Creating Local Support Networks for Bioinformatics Instruction. Presented at Gallaudet University, Washington, DC.

Arora, G. (2016). Genome Solver: creating a Community Science Project in Bioinformatics. Presented at Gallaudet University, Washington, DC.

Arora, G. (2016). NextGen Genome Solver: Faculty Development in Bioinformatics. Presented at Gallaudet University, Washington, DC.

Kyrillos A, Arora G, Murray B and Rosenwald AG. (2015). The Presence of Phage Orthologous Genes in Helicobacter pylori Correlates with the Presence of the Virulence Factors CagA and VacA. Helicobacter, 21 (3), 226-233

Rosenwald, A., Arora, G., Ferrandino, R., Gerace, EL.,Mohammednetej, M., Nosair, W., Ratilla, S., Subic, AZ., Rolfes, R. (2016).Identification of Genes in Candida glabrata Conferring Altered Responses to Caspofungin, a Cell Wall Synthesis Inhibitor. G3, 6 (3), 2893-2907.

2017

Arora, G. (2017, July). Creating a Community Science Project in Bioinformatics. Presented at the American Society of Microbiology Conference of Undergraduate Educators. Denver, CO.

Arora, G. (2017, June). NextGen Genome Solver. Workshop conducted at the Florida International University. Miami, FL.

Hem, C and Arora, G. (2016, October). Listeria monocytogenes shows evidence of horizontal gene transfer. Presented at the Undergraduate Research Symposium in University of Maryland. Baltimore County, MD.

Mathur, V., Arora, G., and Rosenwald, A. (2016, October). Analyzing student learning using bioinformatics course modules as a platform for student engagement in research. Presented at the Young Investigators Meeting. Chicago, IL.

Mathur, V., Arora, G., and Rosenwald, A. (December 2016). Evidence for Student Learning in Bioinformatics. Presented at the American Society for Cell Biology. San Diego, CA.

Mathur, V., Arora, G., and Rosenwald, A. (July 2017) Faculty training and student learning in bioinformatics. Presented at the Transforming Research in Undergraduate STEM Education Conference. Minnesota, MN.

Mathur, V., Arora, G., and Rosenwald, A. (July 2017). Faculty Training and Student Performance Gains in Bioinformatics. Society for the Advancement of Biology Education and Research, Minnesota, MN.

2015

Gormally, C. (2015, July). Building teachable units and assessing learning. Workshop conducted at the National Socio-Environmental Synthesis Center, Annapolis, MD.

2020

Cooper KM1, AJJ Auerbach, JD Bader, AM Beadles-Bohling, JA Brashears, E Cline, SL Eddy, DB Elliot, E Farley, L Fuselier, HM Heinz, M Irving, T Josek, AK Lane, SM Lo, J Maloy, M Nugent, E Offerdahl, J Palacios-Moreno, J Ramos, JW Reid, RA Sparks, AL Waring, M Wilton, C Gormally1, SE Brownell1. 2020. Fourteen recommendations to create a more inclusive environment for LGBTQ+ individuals in academic biology. CBE-LSE. 1 lead authors who contributed equally

Gormally C. 2020. The Comics Project: Synthesizing and communicating science with comics. CourseSource. https://www.coursesource.org/courses/the-comics-project-synthesizing-and-communicating-science-with-comics

Gormally C. 2020. Using comics to make science come alive. CourseSource. https://www.coursesource.org/courses/using-comics-to-make-science-come-alive

Gormally C. Achieving Science Literacy. Presentation, AAC&U Annual conference, Washington, D.C.

Gormally C. Getting personal: Using Graphic Medicine to re-envision and empower science learning and communication. Graphic Medicine. Accepted for Toronto, July 2020. Conference cancelled due to coronavirus.

Gormally C. Invited panelist, STEAM Collaborations: Women’s Environmental Leadership Workshop. Smithsonian Anacostia Community Museum, Washington, D.C.

Gormally C. The Science Stories Project: Connecting Science with Society via Comics. Presentation, AAC&U Transforming STEM Education, Chicago, IL.

Gormally C. What can we learn when science gets personal? Opportunities for making science relevant. Invited talk, Georgetown University School of Medicine, Washington, D.C., February 2020.

Gormally C., A Heil, P Brickman. Characterizing the learning landscape for non-science majors and identifying opportunities for change. HHMI working group on learning objectives for non-science and science majors, Washington, D.C., February 2020.

Heil, Austin, C. Gormally, P. Brickman. Low level learning: leaving behind most students—the non-majors. Presentation, Society for the Advancement of Biology Education Research (SABER), Zoom, July 2020.

2017

Glasser, A., Kushalnagar, K., & Kushalnagar, R. (2017). Feasibility of Using Automatic Speech Recognition with Voices of Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Individuals. In The 19th International ACM SIGACCESS Conference on Computers and Accessibility (pp. 334–336). https://doi.org/10.1145/3132525.3134819

Kushalnagar, P., Ryan, C., Smith, S., & Kushalnagar, R. (2017). Critical health literacy in American deaf college students. Health Promotion International. https://doi.org/10.1093/heapro/dax022

Kushalnagar, R. S. (2017). Who Owns Captioning? In J. Lazar & M. A. Stein (Eds.), Disability, Human Rights, and Information Technology (pp. 182–198). University of Pennsylvania Press, Inc.

Kushalnagar, R. S., Behm, G. W., Ali, S. S., Harvey, S. M., & Bercan, K. G. (2017). Enhancing participation of deaf engineering students in lab discussion. In 2017 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition, Columbus, Ohio (pp. 1–6).

Kushalnagar, R., Glasser, A., & Kushalnagar, K. (2017). Deaf, Hard of Hearing, and Hearing perspectives on using Automatic Speech Recognition in Conversation. In The 19th International ACM SIGACCESS Conference on Computers and Accessibility (pp. 292–298). https://doi.org/10.1145/3132525.3134781

Kushalnagar, R., Seita, M., & Glasser, A. (2017). Closed ASL Interpreting for Online Videos. In Proceedings of the 14th Web for All Conference on The Future of Accessible Work - W4A '17 (pp. 1–4). New York, New York, USA: ACM Press. https://doi.org/10.1145/3058555.3058578

Lasecki, W. S., Miller, C. D., Naim, I., Kushalnagar, R., Sadilek, A., Gildea, D., & Bigham, J. P. (2017, November). Scribe: Deep Integration of Human and Machine Intelligence to Caption Speech in Real Time. Communications of the ACM, 8.

2016

Kushalnagar, R. S. (2015). Optimal viewing distance between deaf viewers and interpreters. Journal on Technology and Persons with Disabilities, 3 (22).

Kushalnagar, R. S., Behm, G. W., Kelstone, A. W., & Ali, S. (2015, October). Tracked Speech-To-Text Display: Enhancing Accessibility and Readability of Real-Time Speech-To-Text. In Proceedings of the 17th International ACM SIGACCESS Conference on Computers & Accessibility (pp. 223-230). ACM.

Kushalnagar, R. S., Kushalnagar, P., & Haddad, F. (2016, July). SingleScreenFocus for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Students. 15th International Conference on Computers Helping People with Special Needs, (pp. 433-437).Springer International Publishing, New York, NY.

2017

Kushalnagar, P., Smith, S., Hopper, M., Ryan, C., Rinkevich, M., & Kushalnagar, R. S. (2016). Making Cancer Health Text on the Internet Easier to Read for Deaf People Who Use American Sign Language. Journal of Cancer Education, 1–7. https://doi.org/10.1007/s13187-016-1059-5

Waller, J. M., & Kushalnagar, R. S. (2016). Evaluation of Automatic Caption Segmentation. In Proceedings of the 18th International ACM SIGACCESS Conference on Computers and Accessibility - ASSETS '16 (pp. 331–332). New York, NY, USA: ACM Press. https://doi.org/10.1145/2982142.2982205

2017

Obiedat, M. A Note on the Construction of Complex and Quaternionic Vector Fields on Spheres. Journal of Mathematical Notes, 93(1) (2013), 104-110

Obiedat, M. A Note on the Construction of Complex and Quaternionic Vector Fields on Spheres. Presented at the Joint Mathematics Meetings of the AMS-MAA, Atlanta, GA.

2016

Sabila, P. (2015). Incorporation of D/HoH in a Nanotechnology Summer Internship. Presentation at the Fall Material Science Research Society Meeting, Boston, MA.

2017

Marceaux, B., Snyder, H. D., Sabila, P. S. & Huber, T. (March 2016). Exfoliation of Bismuth Telluride (Bi2Te3). Poster presented at the 2016 Gallaudet University Research Expo. Washington, DC.

Mbochwa, C., Habtemichael, A., Sabila, P. (March 2016). Growth of Molybdenum Disulfide Films on Silicon Wafers. Poster presented at the 2016 Gallaudet University Research Expo. Washington, DC.

Sabila, P. (2016, June) CIQM, PRDM and Gallaudet university: Nanotechnology Research Experience for Deaf, Hard-of-Hearing Students. Lecture presented at Howard University. Washington, DC.

Sabila, P. (March 2016). Dr. Sabila Research at Gallaudet. Lecture presented during the Research Panel Session at the 2016 Gallaudet University Research Expo. Washington, DC.