Hearing, Speech, and Language Sciences


Deaf and Hard of Hearing Audiology Students: Student and Preceptor Perspectives

ID: 3956
School: School of Human Services and Sciences
Program: Hearing, Speech, and Language Sciences
Status: Ongoing
Start date: September 2020
End Date: September 2021

Description

This project is an ongoing research survey on the perspectives of deaf and hard of hearing AuD students and audiology preceptors.

Principal investigators

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Deaf and Hard of Hearing Students' Skills and Needs for Academic Success

ID: 4056
School: School of Human Services and Sciences
Program: Hearing, Speech, and Language Sciences
Status: Ongoing
Start date: March 2021
End Date: May 2022

Description

There is a persistent gap between Deaf and Hard of Hearing (D?HH) college students and their typically developing peers in terms of academic success. Educators in post-secondary education who work to engage D/HH students with curriculum can offer insight into the trends for post-secondary success. This study will distribute a survey to undergraduate professors at Gallaudet University in order to ascertain the types of learning opportunities used in the classroom, the students’ success with these learning opportunities, the students’ independent use of literacy skills, and the frequency of tutoring referrals. Descriptive analysis will be used to showcase student success with learning opportunities and literacy skills and thematic analysis will be used to analyze the professors’ responses to open-ended questions about prerequisite skills for college and successful course completion. Information from this survey will be used to develop a curriculum-based tutoring program for D/HH college students.

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Exploring Cultural Responsiveness: Guided Scenarios for Communication Science and Disorders Professionals

ID: 4094
School: School of Human Services and Sciences
Program: Hearing, Speech, and Language Sciences
Status: Completed
Start date: October 2020
End Date: November 2020

Description

Case studies regarding cultural responsiveness in communication sciences and disorders clinical practice. Individual chapters address: 1) gender identity and expression 2) misdiagnosis in second language acquisition, and 3) gender, generational, and multilingual variables in diagnosis of hearing ability.

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Approved Products

2021

Ramkissoon, I. (2020). Cognition and Hearing Loss: Gender, Generational and Multilingual Considerations in Differential Diagnosis. In A.B. Hamilton, C.A. Ramos-Pizarro, J.F. Rivera-Perez, W. Gonzalez, & K. Beverly-Ducker (Eds.) Exploring Cultural Responsiveness: Guided Scenarios for Communication Science and Disorders Professionals (pp. 237-242 Rockville, MD: ASHA.

Ramkissoon, I. (2020). Engendering Cultural Responsiveness in Clinical Practice: Regarding Gender Identity and Expression. In A.B. Hamilton, C.A. Ramos-Pizarro, J.F. Rivera-Perez, W. Gonzalez, & K. Beverly-Ducker (Eds.) Exploring Cultural Responsiveness: Guided Scenarios for Communication Sciences and Disorders (CSD) Professionals (pp. 37-42). Rockville, MD: ASHA.

Rivera Perez, J. F. & Ramkissoon, I. (2020). Listening to Silence: Second Language Acquisition and Preventing Misdiagnosis. In A.B. Hamilton, C.A. Ramos-Pizarro, J.F. Rivera-Perez, W. Gonzalez, & K. Beverly-Ducker (Eds.) Exploring Cultural Responsiveness: Guided Scenarios for Communication Science and Disorders Professionals (pp. 43-50). Rockville, MD: ASHA.


Language disorder in deaf and hard-of-hearing (D/HH) children: Typical acquisition and profiles of specific language impairment

ID: 4023
School: School of Human Services and Sciences
Program: Hearing, Speech, and Language Sciences
Status: Ongoing
Start date: December 2019
End Date: September 2021

Description

There is a need for assessments of sign language development that have utility in the educational and clinical setting for discriminating typical language acquisition from atypical language acquisition. While procedures have been used for research purposes, they require specialized training and/or require an extensive amount of time to analyze. There are a limited number of available assessments designed for assessment in real-world educational settings including checklists for early childhood or assessment of specific areas (e.g. receptive ASL syntax). They have a restricted scope of age range or domains of language skills, however. The current study is investigating a variety of measures of language development to identify those that are effective and efficient in differentiating typical from disordered sign language development.

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Funding sources


Prosody in Cochlear Implant Users

ID: 4060
School: School of Human Services and Sciences
Program: Hearing, Speech, and Language Sciences
Status: Ongoing
Start date: September 2019
End Date: September 2025

Description

The purpose of this study is to assess how individuals with cochlear implants understand and express prosodic features of language.

Principal investigators

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Approved Products

2021

Uguccioni, K. & Hawthorne, K. (2020). Vocal emotion detection in cochlear implant users. American Academy of Audiology 2020 + HearTECH Expo, New Orleans, LA. (Conference cancelled due to COVID-19.)


Prosody in Individuals with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

ID: 3993
School: School of Human Services and Sciences
Program: Hearing, Speech, and Language Sciences
Status: Ongoing
Start date: September 2017
End Date: September 2025

Description

The purpose of this project is to develop a profile of prosodic strengths and weaknesses between and within etiologies of intellectual and developmental disabilities.

Principal investigators

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Approved Products

2021

Hawthorne, K., & Loveall, S.J. (2020) Interpretation of ambiguous pronouns in adults with intellectual disabilities. Journal of Intellectual Disability Research, 65(2), 125-132.

Loveall, S.J., Hawthorne, K., & Gaines, M. (2021). A meta-analysis of prosody in autism, Williams syndrome, and Down syndrome. Journal of Communication Disorders, 89.

2020

Rapp, J., Loveall, S., & Hawthorne, K. (2019). Are verbal or nonverbal abilities more related to prosody in adults with intellectual disability? American Speech-Language Hearing Association Convention, Orlando, FL.

Thome, E.K., Loveall, S., & Hawthorne, K. (2019). The prosodic abilities of individuals with Prader-Willi Syndrome. American Speech-Language Hearing Association Convention, Orlando, FL.


Qualities of Good Audiologists

ID: 4089
School: School of Human Services and Sciences
Program: Hearing, Speech, and Language Sciences
Status: Completed
Start date: September 2020
End Date: August 2021

Description

The purpose of this survey is to describe what audiologists view as characteristics that are reflective of a good audiologist, once they have attained the minimal competency necessary for license to practice. This is an exploratory survey in an attempt to identify themes and need for further studies. While the professional accreditation agencies (Council on Academic Accreditation for Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology [CAA], 2017; Accreditation Commission for Audiology Education [ACAE], 2016) detail the professional competencies that graduates from accredited programs must achieve, and therefore leading to a minimum qualification to enter the practice of audiology, very little is discussed or published about audiologists’ perception of what marks one a good audiologist. This exploration of the audiologists’ perception of desirable and undesirable qualities as audiologists are important in least three ways. First, the knowledge of desirable qualities as professionals can help improve the overall caliber of audiologists, by assisting each audiologist in identifying and selecting specific professional improvement goals. Moreover, it may identify gaps in continuing education and training opportunities that target professional qualities that are expressed to be important in the field. Second, the expressed audiologists’ values can be examined to determine the areas of discrepancy and potential conflict with the perceptions and values of those served by audiologists (patients, students, families, communities). For example, noncongruence between audiologist and patient preferences for patient-centeredness has been found and reported (Manchaiah et al., 2017). This survey may identify other areas which may be further studied. . Third, values of audiologists directly or indirectly influence who among the professionals advance in the professional communities; including at a workplace as well as in the state and national organizations. Literature suggests that implicit biases in the healthcare field impact both the student experiences and career advancement for women (e.g., Girod et al., 2016, Rogus-Pulia et al., 2018) and people of color (e.g., Fallin-Bennett, 2015, Jackson et al., 2019, Kaplan et al., 2018, Yates et al., 2017). The concept of ableism in the healthcare field is also starting to get a foothold (Neilson, 2020); healthcare providers with physical or other disabilities are grossly underrepresented (e.g., Schwarz & Zetkulic, 2019), with the various technical standards limiting participation of those with disabilities into the healthcare professions While this particular survey does not target impact of biases, the exploration of the professional qualities that audiologists consider to be desirable or undesirable may yield potential need to study implicit biases.

Principal investigators

Additional investigators

Approved Products

2021

Tamaki C, Mack B, & Sparks, S. (2021). Beyond Minimum Qualifications: What Qualities Make Audiologists Admirable? Poster. AAA 2021 Virtual.

Tamaki C, Sparks S, & Mack B. (2021). Characteristics of Good Audiologists - Are We Biased? Poster. CAPCSD 2021 Virtual Annual Conference.


Recognizing and using emotional and grammatical facial expressions in deaf children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

ID: 3991
School: School of Human Services and Sciences
Program: Hearing, Speech, and Language Sciences
Status: Ongoing
Start date: September 2019
End Date: September 2025

Description

The purpose of this study is to assess how deaf signers, with or without diagnosed intellectual or other communication disorders, use facial expressions during signed communication using the newly developed Evaluation of Prosodic Elements of ASL (EPE-ASL).

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Approved Products

2021

Quimby, S. & Hawthorne, K. (2020). Recognizing and using emotional and grammatical facial expressions in deaf children with Autism Spectrum Disorders. American Speech-Language Hearing Association Convention, Orlando, FL.


Smoking and Aging Effects on the Auditory System

ID: 4106
School: School of Human Services and Sciences
Program: Hearing, Speech, and Language Sciences
Status: Ongoing
Start date: December 2020
End Date: April 2022

Description

The impact of cigarette smoking on adults continues to be an international public health concern, and one of the leading causes of preventable disease. The link between cigarette smoking and exacerbation of chronic disease conditions, such as hearing loss, is starting to become more thoroughly documented in scientific literature. Aging is also known to play an important role in auditory and central nervous system changes over the lifespan. It is possible that audiologists could observe a higher proportion of smokers among their client caseloads as they reach advanced ages. The impacts of smoking and aging on the central nervous system are intertwined, and the combination of the two could have many effects on the auditory pathways of adults. One objective way to monitor the effects of extrinsic factors such as cigarette smoking and intrinsic factors such as biological aging on the central auditory nervous system is to measure an electrophysiological waveform called the auditory middle latency response (AMLR). In order to supplement the clinical and research utilizations of the AMLR, there is an ongoing need for additional knowledge about the effects of subject factors such as age and smoking behavior on the AMLR. The AMLR is an ideal measure for the current study because it reflects physiology of the auditory pathway; it is sensitive to age-related changes in the auditory central nervous system; and it is influenced by the same central structures with which nicotine interacts. Taking the known relationship between smoking, aging, and hearing loss into consideration for the current study, the researchers sought to evaluate the effects of long-term, chronic cigarette smoking compared to acute smoking by measuring the AMLR in younger (aged 19-29 years) versus older (aged 45-72 years) adults, including both smokers and nonsmokers. The current study intends to expand our understanding about how acute smoking effects might be influenced by stimulus type in four groups of participants: younger smokers, younger nonsmokers, older smokers, and older nonsmokers. AMLR waveforms collected from 22 participants are currently being analyzed using Evoked Potential (Intelligent Hearing Systems) software. The outcomes of this study could provide further information about the outcome of nicotine's effects on central auditory pathways, positive or negative.

Principal investigators

Priorities addressed


Speech Recognition Threshold (SRT) Assessment in Children

ID: 4104
School: School of Human Services and Sciences
Program: Hearing, Speech, and Language Sciences
Status: Ongoing
Start date: October 2020
End Date: November 2020

Description

Diagnostic auditory evaluation includes assessment of the hearing threshold for speech signals through the Speech Recognition Threshold (SRT) test. The test stimuli are English spondees. The standard SRT test is not always valid for clients who are not native speakers of English, have limited English proficiency, have a language delay or disorder, or are multilingual speakers. An alternate test, the Digit-SRT was developed by the principal investigator and is currently being evaluated in pediatric populations.

Principal investigators

Additional investigators

Priorities addressed

Approved Products

2021

Ramkissoon, I. (November 2020). Oral Presentation. South African Speech Hearing Language Association (SASHLA)/ ASHA 2020 Virtual Conference. "Paired Digits vs. Pediatric Words: Measuring SRT in Children with Language Disorder or Non-Native English Background."


vHIT Uses and Procedures: A Survey of Audiologists

ID: 3955
School: School of Human Services and Sciences
Program: Hearing, Speech, and Language Sciences
Status: Completed
Start date: July 2020
End Date: May 2021

Description

The vHIT measures semicircular canal function in patients with a suspected vestibular disorder. The clinician creates small but brisk head turns in the directions of the six semicircular canals. Each head turn results in reflexive eye movement to the opposite direction of the head turn, which will allow the subject to maintain focus on a visual target. When the reflex loop between the semicircular canals and the eyes is interrupted, the timing of the eye movements are delayed and measured by the vHIT system. The vHIT has been added to vestibular test batteries in many clinics that provide vestibular services. Because vHIT is a novel assessment tool, the protocols are not solidified. Therefore, modifications to these protocols may be needed depending on the patient population for other factors. In many audiologic assessment tools, a large contributing factor to the need for modification is age. For vHIT, in particular, a client’s age must be taken into account during setup, performance, and data analysis. It would be beneficial to the audiology community to see a comparison of more than two populations in regard to various trends for vHIT procedures and results, since few studies have reported on this. It also is not known whether or not the modifications used in some studies are adopted by the community and how successful they are. This study should provide important data to fellow researchers who utilize this procedure in their vestibular test battery to aid them in maintaining consistency when testing and in choosing which techniques to implement into their practice.

Principal investigators

Additional investigators

Approved Products

2021

O'Neal, J., Tamaki, C., & Sparks, S. (2021). vHIT Uses and Procedures: A Survey of Audiologists. Oral Presentation at AAA Virtual.


Virtual Vestibular Screening Compared to On-site Assessment

ID: 4088
School: School of Human Services and Sciences
Program: Hearing, Speech, and Language Sciences
Status: Ongoing
Start date: July 2021
End Date: September 2021

Description

The growing use of telehealth during the COVID-19 pandemic has sparked the need for alternative modalities of assessment and intervention. Vestibular assessments are included among services that audiologists may provide via telehealth; however, continued work is needed to provide additional support for the use of virtual assessments. The Dynamic Visual Acuity test (DVA) has the potential to be used as a virtual screener to identify patients with vestibular dysfunction who need further diagnostic assessment. The results of this study will provide evidence for the feasibility of telehealth for vestibular screening.

Principal investigators

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What information is provided to families of newly identified deaf/hard of hearing children?

ID: 3961
School: School of Human Services and Sciences
Program: Hearing, Speech, and Language Sciences
Status: Completed
Start date: January 2020
End Date: December 2020

Description

When a child is identified as deaf/hard of hearing, parents are faced with the decision of cochlear implantation (CI). There is currently no policy regarding what information must be provided during the informed consent process. The purpose of this project is to investigate the informed consent process for pediatric cochlear implantation with a focus on the frequently omitted psychosocial, linguistic, and cultural aspects of development with a CI. More specifically, the project is designed to: 1. Identify what information is provided to parents during the informed consent process 2. Determine the percentage of audiologists providing alternatives to CIs 3. Determine the percentage of audiologists present all available communication modalities 4. Determine the percentage of audiologists discuss the long-term risks of cochlear implantation It was hypothesized that: All communication modalities are not discussed by 50%, or more, of audiologists. All long term risks associated with cochlear implantation (e.g. psychosocial implications) are not discussed by 50%, or more, of audiologists. Alternatives to CI are not discussed by 50%, or more, of audiologists. Pediatric audiologists were recruited via a mailing list of 500 individuals, obtained from American Academy of Audiology (AAA). Further recruitment was through private social media groups dedicated to audiologists. Seventeen responses were obtained. The survey was conducted online through Research Electronic Data Capture (REDCap). Future implications of this study may indicate the need for development of a structured policy to ensure parents have equal access to the information prior to proceeding with CI. The research may also reveal a need for restructuring audiology curricula to include a more in-depth education on CI alternatives.

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Funding sources