Psychology


A Brief Cognitive Screening Tool for The Deaf Population: A Pilot Study.

ID: 4114
School: School of Human Services and Sciences
Program: Psychology
Status: Ongoing
Start date: June 2021
End Date: September 2022

Description

The aging of the United States population has led to an increased need for measures that can accurately identify neurodegenerative diseases (Prince et al.,2015). Cognitive screening tools assist in early identification and tracking of cognitive decline, which can facilitate more positive outcomes and increased quality of life (Langa et al., 2017). A recent cognitive screening measure was developed for British Deaf individuals and found to be valid and reliable in identification of dementia in older Deaf signers (Atkinson et al., 2015). Using this research as a foundation, the current study will attempt to develop a novel measure of cognitive functioning in ASL for use with deaf and hard of hearing adults in the United States. This study will evaluate the linguistic and cultural appropriateness of the measure for use with deaf and hard of hearing adults.

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A Translation of the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire-Short Form to American Sign Language

ID: 4112
School: School of Human Services and Sciences
Program: Psychology
Status: Ongoing
Start date: June 2021
End Date: June 2022

Description

Childhood maltreatment is a critical public health issue with long-lasting effects on physical and psychological health outcomes. In the United States, the definition of childhood maltreatment has included physical abuse, emotional (or psychological) abuse, sexual abuse, and neglect that occurs in childhood and is perpetuated by a parent or a caregiver. The current literature on childhood maltreatment among Deaf, Hard of Hearing, and DeafBlind (DHHDB) people is limited. In the existing literature, there is evidence for higher rates of childhood maltreatment in this population along with unique forms of trauma-related to DHHDB people’s communication and language experiences. For this reason, there is a need for a reliable, valid, and accessible measure that screens for childhood maltreatment experiences among DHHDB people. To address this need, this research project will translate a widely used childhood maltreatment measure, the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire-Short Form (CTQ-SF) into American Sign Language (ASL) for use with DHHDB people. To achieve that aim, this project will translate the instructions, items, and response options of the CTQ-SF from English text to ASL video using a team of bilingual Deaf interpreters; evaluate the language and content of the CTQ-SF to increase the measure’s relevancy to DHHDB individuals’ lived experiences; and examine the psychometric elements of CTQ-SF-ASL in a pilot study with signing DHHDB adults in the United States. At the study’s conclusion, there will be an ASL version of the CTQ-SF with preliminary data on its psychometric properties for use with DHHDB people.

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Adaptations of Parent Child Interaction Therapy for Deaf Families

ID: 3385
School: School of Human Services and Sciences
Program: Psychology
Status: Ongoing
Start date: October 2014
End Date: October 2025

Description

The mental health field has recognized the importance of utilizing evidence-based treatments when serving individuals and families. One specific psychological treatment, Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT), has been designated as an evidence-based treatment for young children with disruptive behaviors. While our field has made significant strides in providing evidence to support its treatments, the evidence is often gathered at the exclusion of minority populations. This is particularly true for deaf people, given the unique communication needs and cultural knowledge required to adapt treatments to be accessible to this population. Since fall 2014, Dr. Day has been studying how to effectively adapt PCIT for families with one or more deaf members and who communicate via American Sign Language. This research project has now expanded into a clinical and research training clinic where she provides accessible PCIT services for local deaf families. It also provides formal training in PCIT Therapist Certification to advanced graduate students, allows for graduate and undergraduate student involvement in research, and provides clinical consultation to therapists across the country who are providing PCIT to deaf individuals.

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Approved Products

2017

Day, L.A., Adams Costa, E., Previ, D., & Caverly, C. (2017). Adapting parent-child interaction therapy for deaf families who communicate via American Sign Language: A formal adaptation approach. Cognitive and Behavioral Practice. doi.org/10.1016/j.cbpra.2017.01.008.


BRIDGES- Bias Reduction Intervention: Deaf Gain in Employment Settings

ID: 3755
School: School of Human Services and Sciences
Program: Psychology
Status: Ongoing
Start date: September 2017
End Date: September 2025

Description

This project is a collaboration between faculty in the undergraduate and graduate clinical programs in psychology to address bridges and barriers our students experience on their way to becoming professional psychologists. Anecdotally, we have observed barriers our students experience in their educational careers. Students have described experiences of bias and discrimination that have impacted their progress through their degrees. Nationally, there is a need for deaf mental health professionals to serve deaf populations, but bias against deaf students may result in an underrepresentation of deaf clinicians. We created a participatory research community of students and faculty in the Department of Psychology to assess ways in which our classes, departmental programs, and external training programs can support all students in achieving success. Ongoing projects are informing curricular modifications, interventions, and other programming changes in our department and training programs.

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Approved Products

2020

Day, L., Schooler, D. Miller, C., Wagner, K. (2020). Building Inclusive Training Sites for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Clinical Psychology Trainees, Presentation accepted for the 2020 APPIC Membership Conference, San Diego, CA. (Note: conference was cancelled due to COVID-19 pandemic)

2019

Schooler, D. & Day, L.A. (2019, June). Removing Barriers and Building Bridges for Future Mental Health Professionals from Diverse Backgrounds. Presentation at the 2019 ADARA and AMPHL National Conference, Baltimore, MD.

2021

Schooler, D., Day, L.A., Maynard, S., Rosier, R., Pabon, A., Miller, C.A., & Wagner, K. (2021). Becoming psychologists: Barriers and bridges encountered by deaf and hard of hearing students in education and training settings. JADARA, 54(2), 31-64.


Communication of sexual health knowledge and attitudes by deaf and hard of hearing undergraduates with their parents

ID: 4116
School: School of Human Services and Sciences
Program: Psychology
Status: Ongoing
Start date: October 2020
End Date: December 2021

Description

Among hearing youth transitioning into adulthood, communication with their parents is a major factor influencing the development of knowledge, attitudes, and behavior (Eisenberg et al., 2006; Heisler, 2005; Jaccard et al., 2002; Shtarkshall et al., 2007). Parents and other adults can play a critical role in fostering or undermining a child’s sexual health learning (Knafo-Noam & Schwartz, 2004). Very few studies have investigated the experiences of deaf and hard of hearing (DHH) youth concerning communication about sexual health knowledge and attitudes with their parents. Furthermore, little is known about which parent-youth communication approaches are likely to foster greater knowledge, as well as healthier attitudes and behavior toward sexual health among DHH emerging adults. Thus, this research project attempts to explore the relationship between past and present communication practices among parents and their DHH emerging adults’ sexual health knowledge and attitudes.

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Efficacy of Parent-Child Interaction Therapy with Deaf/Hard-of-Hearing Children and Families

ID: 3745
School: School of Human Services and Sciences
Program: Psychology
Status: Ongoing
Start date: October 2018

Description

Deaf and hard of hearing communities experience barriers to obtaining fully accessible and affirmative mental health care services. These barriers include limited research on the efficacy of mental health treatments and outcomes of clinical services with individuals who are deaf and hard of hearing and lead to the disparity in the number of deaf and hard of hearing individuals who are able to obtain culturally and linguistically affirmative mental health services. Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT) is one of the few interventions that has been adapted for and studied with diverse deaf and hard of hearing families. Post-treatment outcomes from a small sample of clinically-referred families include an increase in parenting skills, a reduction in disruptive child behaviors, and overall parental treatment satisfaction.

Principal investigators

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Approved Products

2020

Cappetta, K., Previ, D., & Day, L. (2020). An Examination of the Dyadic Parent-Child Interaction Coding System (DPICS) in American Sign Language, Poster session presented at the 2020 American Psychological Association Convention, Washington, DC

2019

Costa, E.A., Day, L., Caverly, C., Mellon, N. Ottley, S., Ouellette, M. (2019). PCIT as a behavior and spoken language intervention for young children with hearing loss. Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools.

2020

Day, L.A. (2019, October). Evidence-Based Practices for Whom? Lessons Learned from Parent-Child Interaction Therapy. Presented at The Mental Health Conference, Natick, MA.

2019

Day, L.A., Bruce, S., & Cappetta, K. (2019, June). Identifying the Evidence Behind Effective Discipline Strategies: Lessons Learned from Parent-Child Interaction Therapy. Presentation accepted for the 2019 ADARA and AMPHL National Conference, Baltimore, MD.


Mental Health Literacy & Black Men: A Critical Exploration of Intersecting Black Male Perspectives

ID: 4118
School: School of Human Services and Sciences
Program: Psychology
Status: Ongoing
Start date: January 2020
End Date: December 2021

Description

Depression has been cited as the leading cause of disability globally, affecting more than 300 million people. Much research has been conducted on the topic, yet there is still a dearth of research on mental health among young Black men. Black men are likely to experience greater psychosocial stressors and higher mortality rates than their White counterparts. However, rates of depression among Black men remain consistently lower, with some suggesting that that though less frequent, instances of depression in Black men are more severe. The purpose of this study is to facilitate a discussion of mental health knowledge with Black men. As Black men are a heterogenous group, it is imperative that we consider many intersecting identities of Black men. This particular study examines the experiences of Deaf, hard-of-hearing and hearing Black men. This study aims to explore their knowledge related to signs/symptoms of mental illness, preventative and self-help measures, mental health resources and mental health first-aid along with the sources of that knowledge. The study asks how Black men learn about mental health, from whom and how formal knowledge relates to community experience.

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New Signers: Acculturation and Coping

ID: 3760
School: School of Human Services and Sciences
Program: Psychology
Status: Ongoing
Start date: October 2014

Description

Previous research has examined the transition to college among ethnic minority youth and found that appropriately managing acculturative stress is a significant predictor of psychological adjustment and success during the college transition (Crokett et al., 2007). For example, Mexican-American youth who report higher levels of acculturative stress during their college transition report more frequent symptoms of depression and anxiety. Active coping and parental support, however, can buffer the effects of acculturative stress. Deaf and hard of hearing youth grow up in a culturally diverse settings and arrive at college with varying degrees of experience with Deaf and hearing cultures (Maxwell-McCaw & Zea, 2010). Whereas some youth may have vast experiences with Deaf culture, and a high level of cultural practice including proficiency in ASL and Deaf cultural norms, other youth may have grown up immersed primarily in hearing culture, with little or no exposure to ASL or Deaf culture. Consequently, students matriculating at Gallaudet face a diverse set of challenges relating to acculturation. To date, the acculturative experiences of this population have been understudied. The proposed study examines acculturative stress, coping, and mental and physical health among new Gallaudet students, with specific emphasis on the experiences of new signers.

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Approved Products

2019

Aldalur, A., Maxwell-McCaw, D., & Schooler, D. (2019, June). Mental Health Correlates of Acculturative Stress Among Deaf and Hard of Hearing Young Adults. ADARA Conference, Baltimore, MD.


Parental Disclosure of Adverse Childhood Experiences in Deaf and Hard-of-hearing Children

ID: 4115
School: School of Human Services and Sciences
Program: Psychology
Status: Ongoing
Start date: October 2021
End Date: September 2022

Description

Deaf and Hard-of-hearing (DHH) individuals of all ages may be at higher risk of experiencing language deprivation and neglect, along with other forms of abuse and neglect (Schenkel et al., 2014; Anderson et al., 2017). It is especially challenging for DHH individuals and caregivers of DHH youth to seek trauma-informed treatments that are both evidence-based practices and accessible in their preferred language. The focus of this study is the parent’s disclosure of the traumatic experiences of their DHH child and to identify the protective factors for the DHH child. This is a qualitative study and will be using semi-structured interviews to learn more about the phenomenon of parent’s lived experiences while coping with their child’s traumatic experience(s). This study will explore the unique stressors that parent(s) or caregiver(s)’ experience as a parent of a DHH child who experienced trauma, and how clinicians can support the parents in the disclosure of their child’s trauma history.

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Perception of COVID-19 physical distancing effectiveness and contagiousness of asymptomatic individuals: A cross sectional survey of deaf and hard of hearing adults in U.S.

ID: 4062
School: School of Human Services and Sciences
Program: Psychology
Status: Completed
Start date: January 2021
End Date: December 2021

Description

Paludneviciene, R., Knight, T., Firl, G., Luttrell, K., Takayama, K., & Kushalnagar, P. (2021). Perception of COVID-19 physical distancing effectiveness and contagiousness of asymptomatic individuals: A cross sectional survey of deaf and hard of hearing adults in U.S. Journal of Medical Internet Research. 07/02/2021:21103

Additional investigators

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Approved Products

2021

Perception of COVID-19 physical distancing effectiveness and contagiousness of asymptomatic individuals: A cross sectional survey of deaf and hard of hearing adults in U.S.


Representation of deaf characters in television watched by adolescents and young adults

ID: 3759
School: School of Human Services and Sciences
Program: Psychology
Status: Ongoing
Start date: April 2017
End Date: September 2022

Description

Youth seek connections with television characters as part of the identity formation process. Deaf and hard of hearing youth have traditionally had few opportunities to connect with deaf television characters, but there has been an increase in the representation of deaf people on television in recent years. The current project examines how deaf and hard-of-hearing youth engage with deaf media models using survey and focus group approaches.

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Approved Products

2019

Kobek Pezzarossi, C. & Schooler, D. (2019, June). America's Next Role Model: How deaf college students perceive television representations of deaf individuals. Paper presented at the annual meeting of The American Deafness and Rehabilitation Association (ADARA), Baltimore, MD.

2021

Paglieri, T.A., Kobek Pezzarossi, C.M., Schooler, D. (in press). Social media use, acculturation, and self-esteem of deaf and hard-of-hearing adults. JADARA.


SEXUAL AND GENDER-BASED VIOLENCE IN EUROPEAN ASYLUM RECEPTION FACILITIES: DISCLOSURE EXPERIENCES

ID: 4113
School: School of Human Services and Sciences
Program: Psychology
Status: Ongoing
Start date: June 2021
End Date: June 2022

Description

Sexual and gender-based violence (SGBV) is a known widespread public health issue as well as a human rights violation, deeply rooted in both gender norms and power inequities (Muoo et al, 2020). In refugees, migrants and asylum seekers, high levels of SGBV are suspected, and those living in European asylum reception facilities are especially vulnerable to SGBV, yet little is known in terms of prevalence, causes or even preventable measures in place. One of the ways to improve detection of and therefore better response to SGBV among refugees and migrants is to better facilitate survivors to disclose their experiences to service providers (De Schrijver et al, 2018; Muoo et al, 2020). Unfortunately, social and structural factors can affect one’s ability, opportunity and motivation to disclose (UNCHR, 2019). In order for those factors to be accounted in terms of services provided, they must first be acknowledged. The aim of this study is therefore to look at the services currently provided to refugees, migrants and asylum seekers and factors supporting or impeding their disclosure of SGBV.

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Approved Products

2021

• Vincent, M.(2022). SEXUAL AND GENDER-BASED VIOLENCE IN EUROPEAN ASYLUM RECEPTION FACILITIES: DISCLOSURE EXPERIENCES.


Scholarship and creative activity

2021

Aldalur, A., Pick, LH., Schooler, D., & Maxwell-McCaw, D. (2020). Psychometric properties of the SAFE-D: Acculturative stress in deaf undergraduate students. Rehabilitation Psychology. 65(2), 173-185. https://doi.org/10.1037/rep0000315

Andres Gonzalez, D., Mullane, A., Pick, LH., & Macias Strutt, A. (2020). Language in neuropsychology: Part I, linguistic diversity and determining assessment language. National Academy of Neuropsychology Bulletin, 32(1), 16-19.

Cornwell, M.A., Cicero, B., Grunwald, I., Hall, S., Krause, W., Myers., T., Pick, L., Piedmont., K., Saveage, K., Schmidt, M.S., Twaite, J., Viscovich, N., & Borod, J.C. (2021, February). Early childhood circumstances predict anger bias in older adulthood. Presented at the International Neuropsychological Society 2021 Annual Meeting, San Diego, CA.

Cornwell, M.A., Cicero, B., Grunwald, I., Hall, S., Krause, W., Myers., T., Pick, L., Piedmont., K., Saveage, K., Schmidt, M.S., Twaite, J., Viscovich, N., & Borod, J.C. (2021, February). Integrating affect perception tasks from the New York Emotion Battery into a comprehensive measure of neuropsychological change across the lifespan. Presented at the International Neuropsychological Society 2021 Annual Meeting, San Diego, CA.

Pick, LH, Barreto Abrams, JO, Gonzalez, DA., Suarez, P, & Strutt, AM. (2021). Language in Neuropsychology Part II - Interpreter-mediated neuropsychological services. National Academy of Neuropsychology Bulletin, 32(1), 13-16.

Pick, LH. (2020, November). The role of language diversity in neuropsychological assessment. Presented at the 2020-2021 Psychology Colloquium Series, The Graduate School and University Center of the City University of New York, New York, NY.

Schaefer, L. & Pick, L.H. (2021, February). Promoting equitable and inclusive psychological practices for older adults who are Deaf or disabled. Presented at the 23rd Annual Rehabilitation Psychology Conference (Division 22 and the American Board of Rehabilitation Psychology).

Schaefer, LA & Pick, LH. (2021, August). Clinical assessment of older adults who identify as Deaf or disabled. Skill building session presented at the America Psychological Association 2021 Virtual Conference.