Interpreting and Translation


'Deaf Studies Digital Journal'

ID: 831
School: School of Language, Education, and Culture
Program: Interpreting and Translation
Status: Ongoing
Start date: September 2008
End Date: January 2025

Description

The Deaf Studies Digital Journal (DSDJ) is a peer-reviewed, digital journal in American Sign Language and English text dedicated to advancing the cultural, creative and critical output of work in and about sign languages and its communities, in the form of scholarly video articles, original works of signed literature, interviews, reviews, and historical resources. This project will preserve and migrate past issues of DSDJ to a new open-access, technologically sustainable platform, which adheres to and advances accessibility standards in publishing through fully bilingual video and text articles, advanced interactive videos, integration into library databases, and innovative peer-review processes that support the exclusive use of sign language to produce the next iteration of DSDJ in an effort to transform scholarly communication.

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2012

ASL and Deaf Studies Department (2012). Deaf Studies Digital Journal, Vol. 3. Retrieved from http://dsdj.gallaudet.edu

2014

ASL and Deaf Studies Department (2014). Deaf Studies Digital Journal, Vol. 4. Retrieved from http://dsdj.gallaudet.edu

2010

ASL and Deaf Studies Department. (2009). Deaf Studies Digital Journal, Vol. 1. Retrieved from http://dsdj.gallaudet.edu

2011

ASL and Deaf Studies Department. (2010). Deaf Studies Digital Journal, Vol 2. Retrieved from http://dsdj.gallaudet.edu

2017

Bauman, D.H. (2017, August). Digital embodiment: Sign language publishing and the Deaf Studies Digital Journal. Presented at the Society for Textual Embodiment Scholarship Conference. University of Maryland, College Park, MD.

Boudreault, P. (2017, August). Deaf Studies Digital Journal: The Next Generation. Deaf Academics Conference. Copenhagen, Denmark.

2018

Boudreault, P. (2018, July). Deaf Studies Digital Journal: The preservation, publication and dissemination in Sign Language. Presented at the National Association of the Deaf Conference 2018. Hartford, CT.

Boudreault, P. (2018, September). Deaf Studies Digital Journal: Publishing ASL Poems. Presented at the Center for the Humanities, City University of New York, New York, NY.

Willis, A., Codick, E., Kushalnagar, R. & Boudreault, P. (2018, July). Multimodal visual languages user interface, M3UI. Poster presented at the STM Poster Session, Gallaudet University, Washington, DC.


A Case Study Evaluation of a Formal ASL-English Mentorship Program

ID: 4046
School: School of Language, Education, and Culture
Program: Interpreting and Translation
Status: Completed
Start date: March 2020
End Date: November 2021

Description

Across the United States, many ASL-English interpreters engage in mentoring to improve their skills; however, few structured programs have reported on assessments of their program efficacy. This study conducted a program evaluation of one track of an ASL-English interpreting mentorship program using a case study method to address two research questions: 1) How do participants in a formal, time-specific, distance mentorship program rate the helpfulness of each of the mentorship program’s activities and interventions to their overall language and interpreting skill development? 2) How do participants in a formal, time-specific, distance mentorship program rate their confidence in the value of the mentorship program in improving their overall language and interpreting skills? The study adopted a constructivist and interpretivist qualitative orientation guided by logic modeling, a widely used program evaluation model. The primary participants in this study consisted of eight novice, state-certified, or EIPA rated, ASL-English interpreters participating in an eight-month grant-funded mentorship track focused on advancing their state certification to the professional level. In addition, data was gathered from the mentorship program director, ASL language mentors, and ASL-English interpreter mentors. Multiple data collection techniques were employed including questionnaires, surveys, and document review. The data was coded and analyzed to assess perspectives of participants on the helpfulness of the mentorship program’s activities and interventions and the level of language and interpreting skill confidence that participants experienced while in the mentorship. The ultimate aim of the study was to provide empirical data to be used by ASL-English interpreter mentorship programs to create more effective programming.

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Case Studies of the Cognitive Apprenticeship Approach to Develop Writing Skills of American Sign Language-English Interpreting Students

ID: 3367
School: School of Language, Education, and Culture
Program: Interpreting and Translation
Status: Ongoing
Start date: August 2017

Description

Effective writing is taken to be a measure of academic development at both the undergraduate and graduate levels, but interpreter education has not provided guidance for how to develop these skills in our students. Using a case study approach, the co-investigators will focus is on the development of students' cognitive maturity and self-authorship by examining their perceptions of the Cognitive Apprentice instructional approach during their writing coursework. An ultimate aim of this study is to determine whether cognitive apprenticeship may be a useful approach in guiding interpreting students in the development of their academic writing skills and, if so, to disseminate this information to other interpreter educators.

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Comparative Analysis of Novice and Experienced Interpreters Cognitive Aptitude

ID: 4120
School: School of Language, Education, and Culture
Program: Interpreting and Translation
Status: Completed
Start date: February 2021
End Date: October 2021

Description

In the field of American Sign Language Interpreting, many strive to be successful language brokers in the matter of a few short years, not realizing the acquisition of their mother tongue took constant exposure over several years. An interpreters' ability to properly process information and retain the information long enough to find meaning is a skill that is not developed in a short span of time. As novice interpreters journey through this field, a question that is frequently asked is how do I improve my skill? This study will identify the cognitive aptitude of nationally certified professional ASL-English interpreters compared to novice ASL-English interpreters. To measure cognitive aptitude and agility a quantitative study will be conducted, testing cognitive tasks. Results from the identified groups will be compared and analyzed.

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Examining how Deaf translators negotiate concepts that are not conventionalized in Hong Kong Sign Language

ID: 4020
School: School of Language, Education, and Culture
Program: Interpreting and Translation
Status: Ongoing
Start date: August 2017
End Date: August 2022

Description

In American Sign Language (ASL), fingerspelling is often used to represent English proper nouns, technical words or other concepts that have yet be lexicalized. Conversely, in Hong Kong Sign Language (HKSL), fingerspelling is used on a very limited basis. As a result, sign language interpreters in Hong Kong who work from Cantonese to HKSL frequently report difficulty in relaying concepts for which a conventionalized sign has not yet been developed. This research proposes to engage with the Hong Kong Deaf community to investigate this issue. Translation data will be collected from Deaf bilinguals in Hong Kong who are recognized for their work with translating and interpreting between Deaf monolinguals and the hearing society. Research participants will translate written Chinese materials in either of these two settings: 1) A monologic environment where no specific audience is present; 2) An environment where Deaf audience with specific background and relationship with the Deaf translator is present. Qualitative data will be collected pre-, mid-, and post-task. The aim of this research is to produce a taxonomy of discourse strategies that are used by the Deaf translators and to characterize the cognitive processes that underlie the strategies.

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Language Attitudes about Interpreters

ID: 3369
School: School of Language, Education, and Culture
Program: Interpreting and Translation
Status: Ongoing
Start date: August 2017

Description

The notion of language attitudes has a place in psychology, sociology, anthropology, education, and history, among other disciplines Bilingualism and minority languages are not topics that are confined to linguistics or language studies, but are debated in a wide variety of fields, including Interpretation and Translation Studies. Drawing from data on social media sites, this study addresses the following questions: 1) What language attitudes do signed and spoken language interpreters, translators, and lay persons hold, specifically in relation interpretation and translation work? 2) What attitudes do signed and spoken language interpreters, translators, and lay persons hold about languages, specially in relation to one another's work? The aim of this project is to confront issues of attitudes within interpretation and translation and to show that they will refine and improve our understanding of how we view one another in Interpretation and Translation Studies.

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Sign-to-voice interpreting considering clients with differing language preferences.

ID: 4055
School: School of Language, Education, and Culture
Program: Interpreting and Translation
Status: Ongoing
Start date: September 2018
End Date: September 2023

Description

How can the use of ASL pronominal forms be characterized for early and late/emergent signers? What is the relationship between ASL pronominal patterns of early and late/emergent signers and semantic equivalents that appear in spoken English simultaneous interpretations? In particular, what types of pronouns are interpreted most accurately and least accurately? In addition, if ASL pronouns are not matched with English pronouns, are there common patterns that characterize the resulting interpretation? What aspects of the pronominal system of ASL are challenging for interpreters? How are these challenges impacted by the degree of ASL fluency of the signer in the source text?

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The reading habits of professional signed and spoken language interpreters

ID: 4076
School: School of Language, Education, and Culture
Program: Interpreting and Translation
Status: Completed
Start date: August 2016
End Date: October 2021

Description

Reading is a critical process for conscious learning and enhancing knowledge; however, little is known about reading in interpreters’ professional lives. We used an online survey to collect information about the reading habits of signed language interpreters (n = 1,382) and spoken language interpreters (n = 601) to examine overall patterns, as well as variations, between the groups. The interpreters responded to questions regarding (a) engagement with reading types, (b) hours spent reading, (c) motivations for reading, (d) factors that reduce engagement in reading, (e) reading in which interpreters should engage, (f ) relevance of reading to professional practice, and (g) priority of research topics for reading. Similarities were found between the groups, with divergence in three areas – reading preparation materials, reading research studies, and the types of research studies the participants wish to read. The results provide insights into professional interpreters’ engagement with reading and its application to their professional practice.

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2021

https://www.jbe-platform.com/content/journals/10.1075/tis.20079.nic


What experiences do American Sign Language – English Interpreters from the United States have when working abroad?

ID: 4119
School: School of Language, Education, and Culture
Program: Interpreting and Translation
Status: Completed
Start date: March 2021
End Date: October 2021

Description

The concept of interpreting abroad as an American Sign Language-English interpreter may seem unusual, however previously the possibility of traveling and interpreting for Deaf individuals appeared to be limited to international trips and cruises, higher education, workshops abroad. In today's era, higher education is becoming more accessible to the Deaf community which can lead to higher level positions within companies. Those companies may have various locations across the globe, in turn allowing individuals to move to live and work abroad. Deaf individuals may have interpreters provided to provide language access. I will investigate the experiences that interpreters have when providing American Sign Language interpreting services abroad.

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