Hearing, Speech, and Language Sciences

The department conducts extensive research on communication access technology and rehabilitation for Deaf and hard of hearing people through its Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center on Hearing Enhancement. Faculty, staff, and students conduct research on hearing, speech, spoken and visual language, and balance assessment and intervention across the human lifespan.


Auditory Cortical Deactivation in American Sign Language Users During Word Production

ID: 3653
Status: Ongoing
Start date: February 2019
End Date: March 2020

Description

The goal of this preliminary study is to identify inhibitory activity in auditory regions, detected during the production of American Sign Language (ASL), observed by electroencephalography (EEG) analysis; and, observe how this activity compares to speech inhibition during spoken language. The population of interest includes native ASL users who are prelingually deaf. The recruitment will occur on Gallaudet University's campus during spring semester 2019. The target number of participants is five to seven (N=5-7) adults, over the age of 18. Face-to-face data collection will last approximately 90 minutes, per participant. Clinically, results will have potential applicability to future studies regarding neural plasticity and speech processing during self-production of language.

Principal investigators

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Deaf and Hard of Hearing Audiology Students: Student and Preceptor Perspectives

ID: 3956
Status: Ongoing
Start date: September 2020
End Date: September 2021

Description

This project is an ongoing research survey on the perspectives of deaf and hard of hearing AuD students and audiology preceptors.

Principal investigators

Priorities addressed


Deaf Cochlear Implant Users' Perspectives on Successful Device Outcome Measures

ID: 4026
Status: Completed
Start date: August 2019
End Date: August 2020

Description

In the United States, candidacy and insurance coverage for cochlear implant (CI) technology is largely determined by guidelines set forth by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Current FDA guidelines for CI candidacy include meeting a minimum age requirement, having a certain degree of hearing loss, and demonstrating limited benefit from traditional hearing aid technology as determined by performance on speech perception tests. Given the heavy reliance on measures of speech perception in determining CI candidacy, research surrounding device outcome measures have also generally been based upon the acquisition and understanding of spoken language. While speech perception assessments may be accurate tools to measure or determine device success for the majority of CI users, this pattern of measurement potentially omits a subset of the population, CI users with a preference for communicating via American Sign Language (ASL). The purpose of this study is to shed light on the perspectives of CI users who identify ASL as their preferred or primary language. More specifically, this project aims to: (1) Evaluate what CI users, who are also members of the Deaf community, view as the purpose of their implant; (2) Assess whether or not the purpose of their CI relates to or affects their identity; and (3) Examine the ways that CI users who prefer to communicate via ASL define successful outcomes of implantation.

Principal investigators

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DEAF COCHLEAR IMPLANT USERS’ PERSPECTIVE ON SUCCESSFUL DEVICE OUTCOME MEASURES

ID: 3953
Status: Completed
Start date: February 2019
End Date: August 2020

Description

In the United States, candidacy and insurance coverage for cochlear implant (CI) technology is largely determined by guidelines set forth by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Current FDA guidelines for CI candidacy include meeting a minimum age requirement, having a certain degree of hearing loss, and demonstrating limited benefit from traditional hearing aid technology as determined by performance on speech perception tests. Given the heavy reliance on measures of speech perception in determining CI candidacy, research surrounding device outcome measures have also generally been based upon the acquisition and understanding of spoken language. While speech perception assessments may be accurate tools to measure or determine device success for the majority of CI users, this pattern of measurement potentially omits a subset of the population, CI users with a preference for communicating via American Sign Language (ASL). The purpose of this study is to shed light on the perspectives of CI users who identify ASL as their preferred or primary language. More specifically, this project aims to: Evaluate what CI users, who are also members of the Deaf community, view as the purpose of their implant; Assess whether or not the purpose of their CI relates to or affects their identity; and Examine the ways that CI users who prefer to communicate via ASL define successful outcomes of implantation.

Principal investigators

Additional investigators

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Funding sources


Does absent vestibular function mitigate virtual reality simulator sickness?

ID: 3659
Status: Ongoing
Start date: April 2019
End Date: May 2020

Description

This study is comparing three different groups of individuals: those with absent vestibular function and are deaf, those with normal vestibular function and are deaf, and those with normal vestibular function that are hearing. Participants will be between the ages of 18-30 and will be recruited from Gallaudet University's campus. The target number of participants (N) is 30. These appointments will be conducted in person. The total time requirement will be two separate appointments lasting one hour and a half each, totaling three hours. The level of cybersickness will be evaluated using a self-report questionnaire requesting them to rate their feeling of various symptoms.

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Does Absent Vestibular Function Mitigate Virtual Reality Simulator Sickness?

ID: 3657
Status: Completed
Start date: April 2019
End Date: May 2020

Description

This study is comparing three different groups of individuals: those with absent vestibular function and are deaf, those with normal vestibular function and are deaf, and those with normal vestibular function that are hearing. Participants will be between the ages of 18-30 and will be recruited from Gallaudet University's campus. The target number of participants (N) is 30. These appointments will be conducted in person. The total time requirement will be two separate appointments lasting one hour and a half each, totaling three hours. The level of cybersickness will be evaluated using a self-report questionnaire requesting them to rate their feeling of various symptoms.

Principal investigators

Additional investigators

Priorities addressed

Funding sources

Products

Allemang, L.N. (2019). Does absent vestibular function mitigate virtual reality simulator sickness?


Effect of Preference for Handedness on Direction of Subjective Visual Vertical Tilt

ID: 3954
Status: Completed
Start date: July 2017
End Date: August 2020

Description

Subjective visual vertical (SVV) testing under static, clockwise rotation, and counterclockwise rotation visual background conditions, delivered through an Oculus Rift headset, was administered. Results indicate background rotation has an impact on SVV and head tilt. Handedness may play a role in degree and direction of SVV and head tilt.

Principal investigators

Additional investigators

Priorities addressed

Products

Danner, E.; Zaleski-King, A.; Tamaki, C. (2020, April 1-4) Evaluation of Subjective Visual Vertical with Dynamic Background Using Head-Mounted Display [Conference session]. American Academy of Audiology Conference, New Orleans, LA, United States. (Conference cancelled)

Danner, E.; Zaleski-King, A.; Tamaki, C. (2020, April 1-4) Evaluation of Subjective Visual Vertical with Dynamic Background Using Head-Mounted Display [Poster session]. American Academy of Audiology Conference, New Orleans, LA, United States. (Conference cancelled)


ERPs and Syntactic Processing: Investigating hearing Aid Efficacy in Restoring Auditory Access to Hard-of-Hearing Adults

ID: 3651
Status: Completed
Start date: March 2019
End Date: August 2020

Description

Given our understanding of how hearing aids (HAs) function and the benefits they provide by spectrally tailoring acoustic stimuli to the individual user, two assumptions can be made. First, that hard-of-hearing (HH) individuals with a history of HA use should have sufficient auditory access to the speech signal when properly fit and using their HAs, and second that those same individuals should have the ability to detect syntactic incongruities when aided. The first purpose of this study was to support the assumption that HAs sufficiently restore enough spectral detail to allow for the comprehension of speech and the identification of syntactic errors within that speech. The second was to provide evidence that analysis of the P600, a late-occurring event-related potential, the presence of which is indicative of syntactic cognitive processing, could be used as the objective tool to assess the efficacy and benefit of HAs. It was hypothesized that HH individuals would have P600 responses only with the use of their HAs and that the brain would not be able to correct or supplement missing information in the absence of the appropriate acoustic signals. Results showed that the P600 was only present in the aided condition and in response to sentences with incorrect syntax structures. This not only supported the assumption that HAs provide sufficient spectral detail, but also the hypothesis that the brain would not be able to supplement missing syntactic information, even in peri- and postlingually deafened adults. Though only based on data gathered from a very small sample size (N=6), the study was able to accomplish both objectives. However, further research is needed to determine if there is a more practical clinical utility for the analysis of the P600.

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Exploring Language Exposure's Relationship to Neurobiological Linguistic Outcomes in d/Deaf Infants

ID: 3809
Status: Ongoing
Start date: October 2018
End Date: December 2019

Description

The advantages of early exposure to language in order to firmly establish a first language during early childhood have long been documented for d/Deaf children, as this is critical in future language development and literacy skill. This pilot study seeks to describe D/deaf children's language experience and exposure, to explore how these factors may contribute to successful language development. The proposed study will recruit 5 d/Deaf babies of both hearing and Deaf parents, ages 6-36 months to participate in a battery of language measures. Infant language exposure in American Sign Language (ASL) and spoken English will be reported utilizing the Language Exposure Assessment Tool (LEAT) and parents will also complete the Language Experience and Proficiency Questionnaire (LEAP-Q) to report their own language abilities. Language measures will include: a language sample, the Battelle Developmental Inventory-2nd Ed, parent report of infant language ability using the MacArthur-Bates Communicative Development Inventory- ASL (ASL-CDI), and a vowel contrast speech perception event-related potential (ERP) task. Due to small sample size, results from all measures will be analyzed as components of a linguistic profile of each participant.

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Language disorder in deaf and hard-of-hearing (D/HH) children: Typical acquisition and profiles of specific language impairment

ID: 4023
Status: Ongoing
Start date: January 2020
End Date: September 2021

Description

There is a need for assessments of sign language development that have utility in the educational and clinical setting for discriminating typical language acquisition from atypical language acquisition. While procedures have been used for research purposes, they require specialized training and/or require an extensive amount of time to analyze. There are a limited number of available assessments designed for assessment in real-world educational settings including checklists for early childhood or assessment of specific areas (e.g. receptive ASL syntax). They have a restricted scope of age range or domains of language skills, however. The current study is investigating a variety of measures of language development to identify those that are effective and efficient in differentiating typical from disordered sign language development.

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Monosyllable, Trochee, Spondee (MTS) Test Scores and Communication Self-Evaluation Scores in Spoken Language Environments of Deaf Adult Hearing Aid Users

ID: 3952
Status: Completed
Start date: February 2019
End Date: August 2020

Description

The purpose of this study is to identify connections between the Monosyllable, Trochee, Spondee (MTS) test scores and participants’ real-life experiences with spoken English. This study will aim to achieve this with a correlation analysis between the MTS test scores and the Communication Self-Assessment Scale Inventory for Deaf Adults-Abbreviated (CSDA) scores. The MTS test is a closed-set task that has 3 columns, one with monosyllabic words, one with trochaic words, and one with spondaic words; the participant can have the word recognition correct or the category correct and receives credit for both, the category, or neither (Tyler, n.d.). The MTS tests the patient’s ability to detect pattern perception and to recognize the word. The results from this test may help the clinician decide realistic expectations of amplification (Buxton et al, 2018).

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Prosody in Individuals with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

ID: 3993
Status: Ongoing
Start date: September 2017
End Date: September 2025

Description

The purpose of this project is to develop a profile of prosodic strengths and weaknesses between and within etiologies of intellectual and developmental disabilities.

Principal investigators

Priorities addressed

Products

Rapp, J., Loveall, S., & Hawthorne, K. (2019). Are verbal or nonverbal abilities more related to prosody in adults with intellectual disability? American Speech-Language Hearing Association Convention, Orlando, FL.

Thome, E.K., Loveall, S., & Hawthorne, K. (2019). The prosodic abilities of individuals with Prader-Willi Syndrome. American Speech-Language Hearing Association Convention, Orlando, FL.


Prosody in Speech-Language Pathology

ID: 3995
Status: Completed
Start date: September 2018
End Date: July 2020

Description

Prosodic impairments occur in many clinical populations, including those with autism and motor speech disorders. These impairments can negatively impact intelligibility, as well as an individual’s ability to signal and understand linguistic contrasts and emotions. For this study, we surveyed 245 Speech-Language Pathologists (SLPs) to assess their clinical practices with regards to prosody and to identify potential barriers to addressing prosody in the clinic. While a majority of respondents agreed that prosody was within their scope of practice, they reported that they rarely assessed or treated prosody when they suspected that a client had a prosodic impairment. Overall, respondents felt they were lacking in knowledge of the nature of prosody, experience with clients who have prosodic impairments, and knowledge of assessment and treatment methods for prosody. Recommendations include increasing training opportunities, encouraging collaboration between researchers and SLPs with expertise in prosody, and the development of a clinically feasible prosody assessment.

Principal investigators

Additional investigators

Priorities addressed

Products

Hawthorne, K. & Fischer, S. (2020). Speech-language pathologists and prosody: Training and clinical practices. Journal of Communication Disorders.


Recognizing and using emotional and grammatical facial expressions in deaf children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

ID: 3991
Status: Ongoing
Start date: September 2019
End Date: September 2025

Description

The purpose of this study is to assess how deaf signers, with or without diagnosed intellectual or other communication disorders, use facial expressions during signed communication using the newly developed Evaluation of Prosodic Elements of ASL (EPE-ASL).

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Semantic Congruity Effects in Non-Native ASL Interpreters with Signed Sentences: An ERP Study

ID: 3706
Status: Ongoing
Start date: April 2019

Description

A cognitive neuroscience experiment of how ASL experience changes neural processing of ASL grammatical errors.

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Sign language intervention in a deaf child with specific language impairment

ID: 4025
Status: Completed
Start date: May 2019
End Date: May 2020

Description

Hearing loss is frequently an exclusionary criteria for specific language impairment (SLI). Researchers have observed unexplained language disorders in children who have received accessible visual language from birth, however. There are limited language intervention studies that have measured the efficacy of language therapy when the child uses a natural signed language. This case study examined the outcomes of language intervention provided weekly using focused stimulation. Gains were made in frequency and variety of verbs used. While there were no changes observed in sentence use during probes, changes were noted during intervention activities that were more interactive. Caregiver report also indicated positive outcomes in overall language use at home and in the community. The intervention was disrupted by the COVID-19 pandemic, so results from the 7 week in person sessions are promising.

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Spatial Navigation Abilities in Deaf Older Adults: With and Without Vestibular Impairment

ID: 3434
Status: Ongoing
Start date: October 2016
End Date: October 2019

Description

The purposes of this 3-year project are to: 1. develop and adapt spatial memory and spatial navigation assessment tools to be administered to the deaf/Deaf population; 2. characterize the spatial memory and spatial navigation abilities in young adults who are deaf, with and without vestibular impairments (VI); and 3. assess the role of ASL in spatial memory and navigation abilities in older adults. Older individuals with VI may present with difficulty in spatial memory and navigation, which increases the risk of falling or wayfinding difficulties. High prevalence (54-85%) of VI in the deaf population puts older deaf individuals at risk, while evidence of high visuo-spatial IQ in ASL users suggests that the spatial cognitive functions among deaf ASL users with VI may not be as affected as those among deaf non-ASL users with VI. To address purposes #1 and #2, spatial memory and spatial navigation assessment tools (virtual reality navigation and memory tasks, sense-of-direction questionnaire) will be normed and adapted to the young deaf adult population (ages 21-35). To address purpose #3, these spatial memory and navigation tasks are administered to subjects 60 years or older with different experiences in hearing status, ASL use, and VI.

Principal investigators

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Funding sources

Products

Allemang, L.N., Tamaki, C., Sparks, S., Danner, E., & Maul, K. (2018, April). Spatial Navigation Processing Strategies in Deaf Individuals. Poster presented at American Academy of Audiology Convention, Nashville, TN.

Danner, E., Sparks, S., Allemang, L.N., Maul, K. & Tamaki, C. (2018, April). Use of Video Head Impulse Test for Assessment of Semicircular Canal Function of Deaf Individuals. Poster presented at American Academy of Audiology Convention, Nashville, TN.

Maul, K., Maier, D., & Tamaki, C. (2020, March 17-18th). Language Experience and use of spatial features in ASL story re-tell [Poster presentation]. Psycholinguistic and Neurolinguistic Aspects of Bilingualism and Multilingualism Workshop. CUNY Graduate Center, NY, NY, USA. (Workshop cancelled).

Maul, K., Maier, D., & Tamaki, C. (2020, November 20-22). Use of visual-manual language predicts self-reported sense of direction [Poster presentation]. High Desert Linguistics Society 14th Biennial Conference. Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA.

Maul, K., Tamaki, C., & Scott, G. (2020, May 1). Assessment adaptation: issues in spoken language to visual-manual (ASL) adaptation – focus on semantic fluency [Oral seminar] District of Columbia Speech Language Hearing Association Annual Conference, Rockville, MD, USA. (conference cancelled).

Sparks, S., Danner, E., Allemang, L.N., Tamaki, C., & Maul, K. (2018, Feb). Vestibular Function in Deaf Young Adults Who Received Cochlear Implants as Children. Poster presented at American Balance Society Meeting, Scottsdale, AZ.

Tamaki C & Maul K (2019, Nov). Spatial navigation abilities & self-reported sense of direction in Deaf individuals. Poster. American Speech-Language-Hearing Association Annual Convention, Boston, MA.

Tamaki, C. & Maul, K. (2018, June). Spatial navigation, sense of direction, and vestibular function in young deaf individuals. Presented at XXX Barany Society Meeting, Uppsala, Sweden.

Tamaki, C., Maul, K., Sparks, S., Danner, E., Allemang, L.N., & Ravelo-Mendoza, E. (2018, April). Vestibular and Spatial Cognitive Function Profile of Young Deaf/deaf Individuals. Podium presented at American Academy of Audiology Convention, Nashville, TN.


The Relationship Between Young Bimodal-Bilingual’s (Coda’s) Matching of the Interlocutor Modality and Their Executive Function

ID: 4024
Status: Completed
Start date: May 2019
End Date: May 2020

Description

This project investigated how bimodal bilinguals, age 2-5, matched the modality of interlocutors using ASL or spoken English in two contexts: 1) when only one language is being used in the environment, 2) when both a signed and spoken language were used by in an alternating pattern. Then, the study investigated the relationship between a parent report of executive functioning and matching of the interlocutor’s modality. A word was considered to match the interlocutor’s modality if they provided a response in the target language regardless of whether code-blending was present. Hearing bimodal bilinguals matched the English speaking interlocutor during one-on-one interactions 100% of the time. There was more variability with ASL matching with a range of 30-100% and a mean of 81.58%. In the alternating condition, 7 of 8 participants matched English 100% of the time. In the alternating condition, the participants matched the ASL interlocutor with a range of 33-100% and a mean of 70.11%. Wilcoxon Signed-Rank test indicated no differences between matching in the single language condition and the alternating language conditions for ASL or English. A Kendall’s Tau-b correlation indicated no relationship between parent-reported executive functioning and interlocutor matching for these participants. The findings of this study support previous research suggesting that bimodal bilinguals are sensitive to the communication modality of their interlocutor. There were not differences in matching when only one language was used compared to two languages alternating. It is important to note that this study investigated matching, not linguistic competency.

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vHIT Uses and Procedures: A Survey of Audiologists

ID: 3955
Status: Ongoing
Start date: July 2020
End Date: May 2021

Description

The vHIT measures semicircular canal function in patients with a suspected vestibular disorder. The clinician creates small but brisk head turns in the directions of the six semicircular canals. Each head turn results in reflexive eye movement to the opposite direction of the head turn, which will allow the subject to maintain focus on a visual target. When the reflex loop between the semicircular canals and the eyes is interrupted, the timing of the eye movements are delayed and measured by the vHIT system. The vHIT has been added to vestibular test batteries in many clinics that provide vestibular services. Because vHIT is a novel assessment tool, the protocols are not solidified. Therefore, modifications to these protocols may be needed depending on the patient population for other factors. In many audiologic assessment tools, a large contributing factor to the need for modification is age. For vHIT, in particular, a client’s age must be taken into account during setup, performance, and data analysis. It would be beneficial to the audiology community to see a comparison of more than two populations in regard to various trends for vHIT procedures and results, since few studies have reported on this. It also is not known whether or not the modifications used in some studies are adopted by the community and how successful they are. This study should provide important data to fellow researchers who utilize this procedure in their vestibular test battery to aid them in maintaining consistency when testing and in choosing which techniques to implement into their practice.

Principal investigators

Additional investigators


Vocal Emotional Detection in Cochlear Implant Users

ID: 3648
Status: Ongoing
Start date: February 2019
End Date: May 2020

Description

The purpose of this study is to identify patterns and differences in voice emotion recognition within cochlear implant (CI) users when certain prosodic cues are manipulated. The target sample in this study is 25 cochlear implant users as well as a control group of 25 adults with normal hearing. The recruitment is to occur within Gallaudet University by posting recruitment material in Gallaudet's Daily Digest as well as contacting Hearing Loss Association of American (HLAA). Prior to testing, participants will complete an online questionnaire regarding background information such as age of implantation, type of cochlear implant, onset of hearing loss, etc. In the lab, participants will listen to a variety of sentences spoken by a male and female speaker that will portray four different emotions: happiness, sadness, anger, and neutral. The sentences will be be manipulated in pitch, duration, and intensity and the listener chooses which emotion is conveyed from a closed set based on these prosodic cues. The time required for each participant should be about 1.5 hours. Results will portray which prosodic cue (pitch, duration, or intensity) is most important for detecting emotions in cochlear implant users and individuals with normal hearing.

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What information is provided to families of newly identified deaf/hard of hearing children?

ID: 3961
Status: Ongoing
Start date: January 2020
End Date: December 2020

Description

When a child is identified as deaf/hard of hearing, parents are faced with the decision of cochlear implantation (CI). There is currently no policy regarding what information must be provided during the informed consent process. The purpose of this project is to investigate the informed consent process for pediatric cochlear implantation with a focus on the frequently omitted psychosocial, linguistic, and cultural aspects of development with a CI. More specifically, the project is designed to: 1. Identify what information is provided to parents during the informed consent process 2. Determine the percentage of audiologists providing alternatives to CIs 3. Determine the percentage of audiologists present all available communication modalities 4. Determine the percentage of audiologists discuss the long-term risks of cochlear implantation It was hypothesized that: All communication modalities are not discussed by 50%, or more, of audiologists. All long term risks associated with cochlear implantation (e.g. psychosocial implications) are not discussed by 50%, or more, of audiologists. Alternatives to CI are not discussed by 50%, or more, of audiologists. Pediatric audiologists were recruited via a mailing list of 500 individuals, obtained from American Academy of Audiology (AAA). Further recruitment was through private social media groups dedicated to audiologists. Seventeen responses were obtained. The survey was conducted online through Research Electronic Data Capture (REDCap). Future implications of this study may indicate the need for development of a structured policy to ensure parents have equal access to the information prior to proceeding with CI. The research may also reveal a need for restructuring audiology curricula to include a more in-depth education on CI alternatives.

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Scholarship and creative activity

2018

Medina, M., Seal, B., Cronin, G., & Cushner, D. (March, 2018). Deaf parents' use of touch with their deaf and hearing infants. Presented at the Early Hearing Detection and Intervention (EHDI) Annual Conference, Denver, CO.

2019

Zaleski-King, A., Goupell, M. J., Barac-Cikoja, D., & Bakke, M. (2018). "Bimodal cochlear implant listeners' inability to perceive minimal audible angle differences," Journal of the American Academy of Audiology. Epub ahead of print.

2017

Barac-Cikoja, D., Cole, K., Frick, A., Pizappi, N. (2016, August). Using self-directed exploration to optimize hearing aid use in a noisy environment. Poster presented at International Hearing Aid Research Conference (IHCON), Lake Tahoe, CA.

2018

DePaolis, R., McQuilken, C., & Seal, B. (July 3, 2018). A pediatrician-based intervention to promote language development. Presented at the International Congress on Infant Studies Annual Conference, Philadelphia, PA.

Seal, B., & Garrido-Nag, K. (2018, July). Selecting students for inter-professional training initiatives. Presented at the Office of Special Education Programs Annual Meeting. Arlington, VA.

Seal, B., & Power-deFur, L. (2018, July). Court? The SLP as a Witness in Legal Proceedings (With a Word about Prevention). Presented at the American Speech and Hearing Association Schools Connect 2018. Baltimore, MD.

Seal, B., DePaolis, R., McQuilken, C., & Ingram, S. (July 3, 2018). Building bridges across agencies to identify communication needs of infants born in poverty. Presented at the International Congress on Infant Studies Annual Conference, Philadelphia, PA.

Seal, B., Medina, M. & Cristiano, V. (2018, July). Deaf parents' use of touch to communicate with their 10-month-old infants. Presented at the International Congress on Infant Studies Annual Conference, Philadelphia, PA.

2017

Garrido-Nag, K. (2016). Bimodal-Bilingual Context and Literacy. Gallaudet University Research Expo, March 24, 2016, Washington DC

Garrido-Nag, K., Segismundo, M.S., Cika, K., (2017). From graduate classrooms to elementary classroom: Using Harry Potter and Holes to teach context based language. ASHA Connect, New Orleans, LA.

2015

Garrido-Nag, K. (2015, July). The effects of attention on speech perception in infants. Presented at the Frontiers in Hearing: Beyond Newborn Hearing Screening Symposium, Denver, CO.

Garrido-Nag, K., Strasser, A., Koo, D., & Pick, L. (2014, November). Phonological access in deaf undergraduate native american sign language users. Presented at the meeting of the American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, San Diego, CA.

Guardino, D., Koo, D., Garrido-Nag, K., & Koo, L. (2015, February). Verbal fluency performance among deaf readers. Presented at the meeting of the International Neuropsychological Society, Denver, CO.

Hisagi, M., Garrido-Nag, K., Datta, H., & Shafer, V. (2015). ERP indices of speech processing in bilinguals, bilingualism. Language and Cognition, 18(2).

2015

Jaiswal, S., (2014). The role of vocal fold longitudinal tension in voicing transitions during speech. Presented at the International Conference on Voice Physiology and Biomechanics, Salt Lake City, UT.

Kochis-Jennings, K. A., Finnegan, E. M., Hoffman, H. T., Jaiswal, S., & Hull, D. (2014). Cricothyroid muscle and thyroarytenoid muscle dominance in vocal register control: Preliminary results. Journal of Voice, 28(5), 652-e21.

2017

Klein E., Jaiswal, S., Seal, B. & Nicodemus, B. (2016). Is there a Content Related Difference in Acoustic Prosody during ASL to Spoken English Interpretation? Poster presented at American Speech and Hearing Association Annual National Convention at Philadelphia, PA; November 17-21.

Klein E., Jaiswal, S., Seal, B. & Nicodemus, B. (2017). Acoustic Prosody during ASL to Spoken English Interpretation. Poster presented at Gallaudet Research Expo at Washington D.C; March 30

Klein E., Jaiswal, S., Seal, B. & Nicodemus, B. (2017). Acoustic Prosody during ASL to Spoken English Interpretation. Poster presented at International Interpreting Symposium at Washington D.C; April 1.

2015

Kwon, B. J. (2014, October). Sound effects with auditory syntax (AUX). Presented at the meeting of Acoustical Society of America, Indianapolis, IN.

Kwon, B. J. (2015, February). Fundamentals of AUX (auditory syntax) and its use in research and education. Presented at the meeting of Association for Research in Otolaryngology, Baltimore, MD.

Kwon, B. J., & Perry, T. T. (2014). Identification and multiplicity of double vowels in cochlear implant users. Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, 57, 1983-1996.

Perry, T. T., & Kwon, B. J. (2015). Amplitude fluctuations in a masker influence lexical segmentation in cochlear implant users. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 137, 2070-2079.

2017

Kwon Bomjun J, Holden Laura J, Lopez Brynn, Holden Tim, Cooper Jeffrey, Firszt Jill. (2017, July). Self-exploration of MAPs by cochlear implant users. Poster presented at Conference on Implantable Auditory Prostheses, Lake Tahoe, California.

2019

McCann, J.P. (2019). Bridging the gap for language development. Opening seminar presented at the American Society for Deaf Children.Cumberland, MD.

McCann, J.P. (2019). Parents partnering with providers to identify sign vocabulary that packs a punch. Seminar presented at the American Society for Deaf Children, Newark, DE.

2013

Kochkin, S., Beck, D. L., Christensen, L. A., Medwetsky, L., Northern, J., Sweetow, R., & Taylor, B. (2012). Why consumers return hearing aids: A guide for reducing hearing aid returns. Better Hearing Institute: MarkeTrak VIII.

Medwetsky, L. (2011). Spoken-Language processing model for auditory processing disorders: The intertwining of cognition, language, and auditory processing. Presented at the Rochester Hearing and Speech Center, Rochester, NY.

Medwetsky, L. (2012). Utilizing computer software as a management tool for addressing CAPD. In D. Geffner & D. Swain (Eds.), Auditory processing disorders: Assessment, management and treatment (2nd ed.) San Diego, CA: Plural Publishing.

Medwetsky, L. (2013). A comprehensive approach to assessing/managing spoken language processing disorders (SL-PD). Presented at the meeting of the North Carolina Speech, Hearing, & Language Association, Raleigh, NC.

Medwetsky, L. (2013). Listen up to smarter, smaller hearing aids/Interviewer: Jon Hamilton. Retrieved from http://www.npr.org/blogs/health/2013/04/08/176225511/listen-up-to-smarter-smaller-hearing-aids

Medwetsky, L. (2013). Overview of Gallaudet's peer-mentoring program. Presented at the meeting of the Hearing Loss Association of America, Portland, OR.

Moncrieff, D., Bellis, T. J., Lucker, J. R., & Medwetsky, L. (2013). Grand rounds on auditory processing disorder. Panel presentation for the American Academy of Audiology. Retrieved from http://eo2.commpartners.com/users/audio/session.php?id=11322

2015

Medwetsky, L. (2014). Transitioning from high school to college: helpful hints. Hearing Loss Magazine, 2014(November/December), 32-35.

Medwetsky, L. (2014, November). Disentangling central auditory processing test findings: A road to greater clarity. Presented at the meeting of the American Speech, Language, and Hearing Association, Orlando, FL.

Medwetsky, L. (2014, October). Part 1. Auditory processing disorders: Assessment, mechanisms, & breakdowns. Presented at the Buffalo Hearing and Speech Center Continuing Clinical Competencies Series, Buffalo, NY.

Medwetsky, L. (2014, October). Part 2. Auditory processing disorders: Intervention. Presented at the Buffalo Hearing and Speech Center Continuing Clinical Competencies Series, Buffalo, NY.

Medwetsky, L. (2015). Hearing aid connectivity: Bridging a closer connection to the world of sound. Hearing Loss Magazine, 2015(July/August), 18-22.

Medwetsky, L. (2015). Mobile device apps for people with hearing loss. Hearing Loss Magazine, 2015(September/October), 20-23, 29.

Medwetsky, L. (2015). Resources worth their weight in gold: Gallaudet University's peer mentoring program. Hearing Loss Magazine, 34-35.

Medwetsky, L. (2015, April). Comprehensive audiological assessment of individuals with severe to profound sensorineural hearing loss. Presented at the meeting of the New York State Speech, Language, and Hearing Association, Rochester, NY.

Medwetsky, L. (2015, April). Spoken-language processing approach to assessment and management of auditory processing disorders. Presented at the New York State Speech, Language, and Hearing Association, Rochester, NY.

Medwetsky, L. (2015, May). Spoken-language processing approach to assessment and intervention of auditory spoken-language processing disorders. Presented at the meeting of the Maryland Speech, Language, and Hearing Association, Towson, MD.

Medwetsky, L. (2015, May). Spoken-language processing model: A conceptualization guiding the assessment and intervention of auditory processing disorders. Presented at the meeting of the Maryland Speech, Language, and Hearing Association, Towson, MD.

2016

Medwetsky L (2015). Mobile device apps for people with hearing loss: Part 2. Hearing Loss Magazine. November-December: 26-32.

Medwetsky, L. & Yoshinaga-Itano, C. (2016, April 15). Theoretical model for speech contrast perception and its application to assessment and habilitation. Presented at The American Academy of Audiology, Phoenix, AZ.

Medwetsky, L. & Yoshinaga-Itano, C. (2016,April ) Auditory Discrimination of English Phonemes: Hierarchy of Difficulty. Presented at the American Academy of Audiology, Phoenix, Az

Medwetsky, L. (2015). Mobile device apps for people with hearing loss: Part 1. Hearing Loss Magazine; September-October: 20-23, 29.

Medwetsky, L. (2015, October). Perception of Speech Contrasts as a Function of the Degree of Hearing Loss/Processing Related Deficits: Implications for Assessment and Intervention. Presented at the HESP Seminar series at the Unversity of Maryland, College Park MD.

Medwetsky, L. (2016). Auditory brainstem response testing for early detection of hearing loss and abnormaslities of the auditory nervous system. Hearing Loss Magazine. July-August: 40-43.

Medwetsky, L. (2016). I can hear but I can't understand. Hearing Loss Magazine. March-April: 28-30.

Medwetsky, L. (2016). Otoacoustic emissions testing: A criticdal procedure for detecting hearing loss. Hearing Loss Magazine. May-June: 20-23.

Medwetsky, L. (2016, April). Interpreting Central Auditory Processing Test Findings: Not That Straightforward. Presented at the American Academy of Audiology, Phoenix, Az.

Medwetsky, L. (2016, April). Spoken-Language Processing Approach: Encompassing Auditory Processing Within a Broader Framework. Presented at the American Academy of Audiology, Phoenix, Az.

Medwetsky, L. (2016, June). A Comprehensive Approach to Assessing/ Managing Spoken-Language Processing Disorders (S-LPD). Presented at the Louisiana Speech and Hearing Association. Lafayette, La.

Medwetsky, L. (2016, June). Hearing Aid Connectivity: Bridging a Closer Connection to the World of Sound. Presented at the Hearing Loss Association of America convention, Washington, DC.

Medwetsky, L. (2016, June). Interpreting Spoken-Language Test Findings: Not That Straightforward. Presented at the Louisiana Speech and Hearing Association. Lafayette, La.

Medwetsky, L. (2016, June). The Spoken-Language Processing Approach: Broadening our Conceptualization of Central Auditory Processing. Presented at the Louisiana Speech and Hearing Association. Lafayette, La.

Medwetsky, L. (2016, June). Understanding the Audiogram and Audiometric Testing: So What? Presented at the Hearing Loss Association of America convention, Washington, DC.

Medwetsky, L. (2016, May). Hearing Needs Assessment: Individualizing the Recommendations. Presented to the Hearing Loss Association of DC.

2017

Medwetsky L (2016). Confidence comes when you truly find yourself. Hearing Loss magazine. November-December: 29-32.

Medwetsky, L (2017). Do my hearing aids really need all of the bells and whistles. Hearing Loss Magazine. September-October: 28-32.

Medwetsky, L (2017). Low cost hearing devices: The possibilities and limitations. Hearing Loss Magazine. May-June: 28-32.

Medwetsky, Larry. (April, 2017). A Comprehensive Assessment Approach to Assessing Central Auditory Processing: Obtaining Test Results that Guide Individualized Intervention. Presentation at the California Speech and Hearing Association Annual Convention, Pasadena, CA.

Medwetsky, Larry. (April, 2017). Maximizing Everyday Connectivity: A Never Ending Discovery Process. Presentation at the 2nd Annual CHIP Conference: A Call to Connect: Communication, Partnership and Community, Montreal, Canada.

Medwetsky, Larry. (April, 2017). Spoken-Language Processing Approach: An Integrative Framework for Understanding Central Auditory Processing Disorders. Presentation at the California Speech and Hearing Association Annual Convention, Pasadena, CA.

Medwetsky, Larry. (June, 2017). Do My Hearing Aids Really Need All the Bells and Whistles? Presentation at Hearing Loss Association of America Annual Convention, Salt Lake City, UT.

Medwetsky, Larry. (May, 2017). A hearing needs assessment: Individualizing the recommendations. Part II. Presentation to Hearing Loss Association of America- Maryland Chapter, Bethesda, MD.

2019

Medwetsky L. (2018). Addressing Controversies In Central Auditory Processing. A panel presentation at the American Speech and Hearing Association Annual Convention. Boston, MA.

Medwetsky L. (2018). Interprofessional Collaboration: Solving the APD Puzzle between SLPs and Audiologists. American Speech and Hearing Association Annual Convention. Boston, MA.

2017

Mejia, M., Jaiswal, S., Palmer, B., & Allen, A (2016). Using Modified Resonant Voice Therapy to Enhance Speech Intelligibility in a Prelingually Deafened Individual. Poster presented at American Speech and Hearing Association Annual National Convention at Philadelphia, PA; November 17-21.

2019

Hamza, Y., Okalidou, A., Kyriafinis, G., & van Wieringen, A. (2018). Sonority's Effect as a Surface Cue on Lexical Speech Perception of Children with Cochlear Implants. Ear and Hearing, 39(5), 992-1007.

Koenig, L. L., Okalidou, A., & Psillas, G. (2018). Velopharyngeal control in children with cochlear implants: Nasalance data in vowel and consonant segments. The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 144(3), 1965.

Okalidou, A., Adamidou, Ch., & Kyriafinis, G. (2018). Do articulation and phonological errors affect receptive vocabulary in children with cochlear implants? 2018 ASHA Convention, Nov. 15-17, Boston MA.

Okalidou, A., Papavassiliou-Alexiou, I., Zourna, C., & Anagnostou, F. E. (2018). Managing Communication of Students with Cochlear Implants in Schools for the Deaf: Professional Practices. Communication Disorders Quarterly, 39(4), 451-465.

Okalidou, A., Peng, Z. E., Pantazidou P., Fels, J., Nistikakis, M. & Kyriafinis, G. (2018). Effects of background noise in vowel productions of children with cochlear implants. The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 144(3), 1893.

Sfakianaki, A., Nicolaidis, K., Okalidou, A., & Vlahavas, G. (2018). Coarticulatory dynamics in Greek disyllables produced by young adults with and without hearing loss. Clinical linguistics & phonetics, 32(12), 1162-1184.

Talli, I., Okalidou, A., Tsalighopoulos, M. (2018). The relation between short-term memory and vocabulary skills in Greek children with cochlear implants - the role of hearing experience. First Language. 38(4), 359-381, DOI: 10.1177/0142723717749073.

2019

Cristiano, V., Mesta, K., & Seal, B. (2018, November). Contributions of Deaf parents' mouth movements in bilingual-bimodal language acquisition. American Speech-Language Hearing Association (ASHA) Annual Conference, Boston, MA.

Cristiano, V., Mesta, K., & Seal, B. (2019, April 4). Contributions of Deaf parents' mouth movements in bimodal-bilingual language acquisition. Gallaudet Research EXPO.

Cristiano, V., Mesta, K., & Seal, B. (2019, March). Contributions of Deaf parents' mouth movements in bilingual-bimodal language acquisition. Early Hearing Detection and Intervention (EHDI) Annual Conference, Chicago, IL.

Harbick, S., Ingram, S., DePaolis, R., McQuilken, C., & Seal, B. (April 2019). Spoken language outcomes of interventions designed to facilitate infant-caregiver communication: A systematic review. Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) Biennial Meeting. Baltimore, MD.

Hudson, K., & Seal, B. (2019, April 4). Communication background and fingerspelling test scores in deaf and hard of hearing undergraduates. Gallaudet Research EXPO.

Jaiswal, S., Klein, E., Nicodemus, B., & Seal, B. (2019). Examining the acoustic prosodic features of ASL to English interpreting. Symposium on Signed Language Interpretation and Translation Research. Washington, D.C: Gallaudet University Press.

Markfield, J., DePaolis, R., McGillon, M., McQuilken, C., & Seal, B. (April 2019). American and British speech differences in low socioeconomic status homes. Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) Biennial Meeting. Baltimore, MD.

Seal, B. C. (2018, November) Graduate school applications: will you be accepted, rejected, or waitlisted? The ASHA Leader. Rockville, MD: ASHA Press.

Seal, B. C. (2019). Speech development for children with hearing loss, Chapter 8. In Raymond Hul (Eds), Introduction to Aural Rehabilitation, 2nd Edition. San Diego, CA: Plural Publishing.

Seal, B. C. (2019, March). InterProfessional Practice: Learning from, with, and about other Professionals. Speech and Hearing Association of Virginia (SHAV) Annual Meeting. Richmond, VA.

Seal, B. C. (2019, March). Poverty and the role of speech-language pathologists. Speech and Hearing Association of Virginia (SHAV) Annual Meeting, Richmond, VA.

Seal, B. C., & Power-deFur, L. (2018, November). SLPs communicating as expert witnesses in due process and litigation. American Speech-Language Hearing Association (ASHA) Annual Conference, Boston, MA.

2017

Segismundo Ma. Concepcion, Maul Kristen, Shah Yasmeen, Goffen Robin. (2016, November). Enhancing Spontaneous Verbalizations in Chronic Aphasia: Transfer Package of Intensive Language Action Therapy. Poster presented at American Speech-Language-Hearing Association Annual Convention, Philadelphia, PA.

2017

Tamaki Chizuko, & Maul Kristen. (2016, November). So What You Are Dizzy? What Does Vestibular Function Have to do With Cognition? Poster presented at American Speech-Language-Hearing Association Annual Convention, Philadelphia, PA.

2019

Allemang LN, & Tamaki C.(Nov 2018). Does absent vestibular function mitigate virtual reality simulator sickness? Poster. American Speech-Language-Hearing Association Annual Convention, Boston, MA.

Allemang LN, Tamaki C, Sparks S, Danner E, & Maul K. (2018, April). Spatial Navigation Processing Strategies in Deaf Individuals. Poster. American Academy of Audiology Convention 2018, Nashville, TN.

Danner E, Sparks S, Allemang LN, Maul K, & Tamaki C. (2018, April). Use of Video Head Impulse Test for Assessment of Semicircular Canal Function of Deaf Individuals. Poster. American Academy of Audiology Convention 2018, Nashville, TN.

Feldewert C, & Tamaki C. (2018, November). Adult perceptions of audiologists. Poster. American Speech-Language-Hearing Association Annual Convention, Boston, MA.

Maul K, Scott G, Tamaki C, Sparks S, Danner E, Allemang LN, & Maier D. (2018, November). Language background of young adults who are deaf, in a bilingual university setting. Poster. American Speech-Language-Hearing Association Annual Convention, Boston, MA.

Sparks S, & Tamaki C. (2018, November). The influence of prelingual deafness & american sign language use on random saccades test results. Poster. American Speech-Language-Hearing Association Annual Convention, Boston, MA.

Sparks, S., Danner, E., Allemang, L.N., Tamaki, C., & Maul, K. (2018, February). Vestibular Function in Deaf Young Adults Who Received Cochlear Implants as Children. Poster. American Balance Society Meeting, Scottsdale, AZ.

Tamaki C, & Maul K. (2018, June). Spatial navigation, sense of direction, and vestibular function in young deaf individuals. Oral Presentation. XXX Barany Society Meeting, Uppsala, Sweden.

Tamaki C, Maul K, Sparks S, Danner E, Allemang LN, & Maier D. (Nov 2018). Research involving participants who are deaf - challenges, ethical considerations, & suggestions. Poster. American Speech-Language-Hearing Association Annual Convention, Boston, MA.

Tamaki C, Maul K, Sparks S, Danner E, Allemang LN, & Ravelo-Mendoza E (2018, April). Vestibular and Spatial Cognitive Function Profile of Young Deaf/deaf Individuals. Research Podium. American Academy of Audiology Convention, Nashville, TN.

Tamaki C, Maul K, Sparks S, Danner E, Maier D, Allemang LN & Scott G. (2019, February). "Good balance" in young deaf adults. Poster. American Balance Society Annual Meeting, Scottsdale, AZ.

2019

Bosley, B., Hawthorne, K., Kellum, K., & Loveall, S. (2018). RECALL reading intervention for children with moderate to severe language delays. American Speech-Language Hearing Association Convention, Boston, MA.

Bowers A., Saltuklaroglu T., Jenson D., Harkrider A., & Thornton D. (2019) Power and phase coherence in sensorimotor mu and temporal lobe alpha components during covert and overt syllable production. Exp Brain Res. 2019 Mar;237(3):705-721. doi: 10.1007/s00221-018-5447-4

Gaines, M., Loveall, S., & Hawthorne, K.(2018). A meta-analysis of prosody in intellectual disabilities. American Speech-Language Hearing Association Convention, Boston, MA.

Hawthorne, K. & Loveall, S. (2018). Pronoun processing in adults with and without intellectual disabilities. American Speech-Language Hearing Association Convention, Boston, MA.

Saltuklaroglu T, Bowers A, Harkrider AW, Casenhiser D, Reilly KJ, Jenson DE, Thornton D. EEG mu rhythms: Rich sources of sensorimotor information in speech processing. Brain Lang. 2018 Dec;187:41-61. doi: 10.1016/j.bandl.2018.09.005.

Thornton D, Harkrider A.W., Jenson D.E., & Saltuklaroglu T. (2019). Sex differences in early sensorimotor processing for speech discrimination. Sci Rep., 9(1):392. doi: 10.1038/s41598-018-36775-5.

Thornton D., Harkrider A.W., Jenson D., & Saltuklaroglu T. (2018) Sensorimotor activity measured via oscillations of EEG mu rhythms in speech and non-speech discrimination tasks with and without segmentation demands. Brain Lang., 2018 Dec;187:62-73. doi: 10.1016/j.bandl.2017.03.011.

2016

Yoshinaga-itano, C. (2016, April 20). Early detection (newborn hearing screening) on early intervention impact on language development. Presented at US-Russia Peer-to-Peer Program. St. Petersburg, Russia.

Yoshinaga-Itano, C. (2016, May 28). Speech takes a piggyback on sign language. Presented at X International Workshop on Advances in Audiology. Salamanca, Spain: Universidad Salamanca.

Yoshinaga-Itano, C. (2016, May 6). The communication is the key. Presented in Santiago, Chile.

Yoshinaga-Itano, C., Park, A., Nunez, L. (2016, April 9). Evolution of a revolution: Universal newborn hearing screening. Presented at National Academies of Practice, Baltimore, MD.