Chemistry


Bismuth Telluride and Molybdenum Disulfide Nanomaterials

ID: 3484
School: School of Science, Technology, Accessibility, Mathematics, and Public Health
Program: Chemistry
Status: Ongoing
Start date: October 2016
End Date: October 2020

Description

This project aims to develop a protocol for large scale synthesis of molybdenum disulfide and bismuth telluride nanomaterials using the chemical exfoliation method.

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2017

Gutierrez, J.; Sabila, P.; Huber, T. Bismuth Telluride (Bi2Te3). (2017, August). Lecture presentation at Harvard University, Boston, MA.

Lalescu, J.; Gutierrez, J.; Sabila, P. (2017, Summer) Introduction to ASL and Deaf Culture. Presented at Harvard University, Boston, MA.

Lalescu, J.; Gutierrez, J.; Sabila, P. (2017, Summer) Introduction to ASL and Deaf Culture. Presented at Howard University, Washington, DC.

Lalescu, J.; Sabila, P. (2017, August). Exfoliation of Molybdenum Disulfide (MoS2) using n-butyllithium. Lecture presentation at Harvard University, Boston, MA.

Mbochwa, C., Sabila, P., Snyder, H. D., Huber, T & Johnson, S. (2016, October). The Effects of Reaction time and Solvent System on MoS2 Exfoliation. Poster presented at the 2016 Undergraduate Research Symposium at the University of Maryland-Baltimore campus, Baltimore, MD.


Computer Simulations to Understand Disease Mechanisms

ID: 3390
School: School of Science, Technology, Accessibility, Mathematics, and Public Health
Program: Chemistry
Status: Ongoing
Start date: September 2016

Description

This project utilizes multiscale computer simulation methods to understand Mendelian disease mechanisms at the molecular level. Computer simulations use the tools of math and physics to solve problems in chemistry, biology, and medicine. Mendalian diseases are monogenic disorders caused by a variation in one gene and sometimes run in families. In general, these are rare genetic disorders with no cure. Our approach is to understand how a single variation in a single gene can cause a disease at the molecular level. This is done by simulations of the natural and variant proteins and comparing various properties. Once we understand the effects of single variations, our next step is to possibly design drugs to reverse the harmful effects. Currently, computer simulations are being run in our HPC Limulus supercomputer, as well as Clemson Palmetto Supercomputing cluster through our collaboration.

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Approved Products

2017

Kucukkal, T. G. (2017). A Whone New Virtual World: Computational Chemistry. Presented at Gallaudet University Research Expo, Washington, DC.

Kucukkal, T. G. (2017). Effects of Rett Syndrome Mutations on MeCP2 Stability and Binding to DNA. Presented at International Conference on GEnomic Medicine, Baltimore, MD.


Designing Serious Games for Chemistry

ID: 3613
School: School of Science, Technology, Accessibility, Mathematics, and Public Health
Program: Chemistry
Status: Ongoing
Start date: September 2017
End Date: October 2020

Description

Blended learning techniques such as game-based learning has always been viewed as an effective tool in various levels from grade school to higher education. However, despite the popularity of gaming in youth and its potential in student engagement and motivation, it has not been exploited extensively particularly in higher education. With these in mind, we develop 'serious games' to be used in chemistry (and possibly other) courses to increase student engagement and motivation, and eventually the learning. Recently, we designed the "PChem Challenge Game" with rather ancient 'snakes and ladders' game mechanics in mind, but transforming it into a unique blend of pure luck and knowledge. The game now is part of the curriculum at Gallaudet and currently, we are testing its efficacy in different institutions across the country. Similarly, the project is being extended to other courses at Gallaudet. An unexpected benefit of the approach has been that it helps improve students' technical ASL since the game requires players to read questions for other players and provide clues when needed.

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Incorporating Original Research into Undergraduate Chemistry Curriculum

ID: 3615
School: School of Science, Technology, Accessibility, Mathematics, and Public Health
Program: Chemistry
Status: Ongoing
Start date: September 2017
End Date: October 2020

Description

Incorporating original research into undergraduate chemistry courses is still in infancy despite the fact that it has a great potential to promote the 21st century skills such as collaboration, critical thinking, and problem-solving. Integrating research into classroom teaching also expected to stir deep learning through inquiry as well as leading to better student engagement. Within the context of this project, we develop and test original research projects suitable for undergraduate teaching at various levels. One such project was applied in a first semester physical chemistry course in Fall 2017. Besides longer-term benefits described above, the original research incorporated in the classroom sparked an immediate interest in pursuing further research in one of the students. Also, we report the challenges such as finding a suitable research problem, adjusting the difficulty and dividing the work evenly among students. Currently, we are in collaboration or looking for collaborating with faculty in science, math and computer fields to develop similar original research to be incorporated in their classrooms.

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2018

Kucukkal, T. G. (2017, July). Integrating Original Research in Undergraduate Physical Chemistry Curriculum. Presented at the meeting of Counsel on Undergraduate Research Biennial Conference, Arlington, VA.


Investigations of the effect of catalyst loading on cross-metathesis reaction

ID: 1993
School: School of Science, Technology, Accessibility, Mathematics, and Public Health
Program: Chemistry
Status: Ongoing
Start date: October 2012
End Date: December 2020

Description

Investigations were carried out using various cross-metathesis catalysts to determine effect of catalyst concentration on the reaction. This has a potential application in chemical, polymer, and pharmaceutical industries, as it could potentially lead to reduced cost of production.

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2015

Sabila, P. S. (2015). Styrene cross-metathesis using low catalyst concentrations. Universal Journal of Chemistry, 3(3), 87-90.


Partnership in reduced dimensional materials (PRDM): Preparation of molybdenum disulfide nanomaterials

ID: 1991
School: School of Science, Technology, Accessibility, Mathematics, and Public Health
Program: Chemistry
Status: Ongoing
Start date: October 2012
End Date: December 2020

Description

The project worked on developing strategies for the preparation of molybdenum disulfide nanomaterials, which have potential applications in fabrication of electronic devices and semiconductors. Two approaches for synthesis of nanomaterials were explored. The first strategy was successful in depositing molybdenum disulfide films on silicon wafers. The resulting products were analyzed using a Scanning Electron Microscope, which produces images of a sample by scanning it with a focused beam of electrons and contains information about the sample's surface composition and features. Further analyses are done using Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy and Profilometer.

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2013

Gallaudet Office of Communications and Public Relations. (2012). Nanotechnology helps generate interest in science class, careers. On The Green. Retrieved from http://www.gallaudet.edu/news/nanoexpress_2012.html

Gallaudet Office of Communications and Public Relations. (2012). NSF grant to enhance research at Gallaudet, other universities. On The Green. Retrieved from https://www.gallaudet.edu/news/nsf_grant_enhance_nanotech.html

Gallaudet Office of Communications and Public Relations. (2013). Department of Science, Technology, and Mathematics works to narrow gap for Deaf students in STEM fields. On The Green. Retrieved from http://www.gallaudet.edu/news/stem_mgl_internships.html

2015

Houghton, M., Snyder, H. D., & Sabila, P. S. (2015, August). Growth, characterization and exfoliation of molybdenum sulfide (MoS2) nanomaterials. Presented at the Cornell Center for Materials Research Symposium, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY.


Synthesis of bismuth telluride nanomaterials

ID: 2551
School: School of Science, Technology, Accessibility, Mathematics, and Public Health
Program: Chemistry
Status: Ongoing
Start date: May 2015
End Date: August 2024

Description

To synthesize nanomaterials of bismuth telluride using chemical exfoliation method. We have successfully used chemical exfoliation to prepare molybdenum disulfide nanomaterials and films. We wanted to see if the same approach could be applied to bulk bismuth telluride to prepared thin films (2-dimensional materials). Bismuth telluride has been shown to exhibit interesting thermoelectric properties that convert heat to electricity. The goal of this project is to design a method for producing bismuth telluride films on silicon wafers. The films will be analyzed using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), optical microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. We are also interested in studying the depth and density of deposited bismuth telluride films on silicon wafers.

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2015

Marceaux, B., Snyder, H. D., Sabila, P. S., & Huber, T. (2015, August). Exfoliation of Bismuth Telluride (Bi2Te3). Presented at the Centre for Information Quality Management Research Convocation, MIT, Boston, MA.