ASL and Deaf Studies

ASL and Deaf Studies faculty engage graduate and undergraduate students in interdisciplinary research projects dedicated to producing new knowledge about Deaf communities and their signed languages. Central areas of inquiry include sensory orientation, DeafSpace, bioethics, identity formation, human rights, language teaching, transnationalism, and the contributions of Deaf individuals to human diversity.


"ASL Connect and the Future of Language Learning Online”

ID: 2758
Status: Completed
Start date: February 2020
End Date: February 2020

Description

A pilot study was conducted to assess the effectiveness of eight weekly video conferencing lessons designed for families of deaf and hard of hearing infants and toddlers. The initial findings show that there was a shift in caregivers’ attitudes as they develop sign language skills.

Principal investigators

Priorities addressed

Products

Pudans-Smith, K. (2015, June). When GPS won't do: Meaningful ASL curriculum mapping. Presented at the meeting of the American Sign Language Teachers Association, Minneapolis, MN.


ASL Connect and the Future of Language Learning Online with Families

ID: 3971
Status: Completed
Start date: March 2020
End Date: March 2020

Description

Constraints in Early Intervention services using deaf and hard of hearing (DHH) adults with families of DHH children are magnified by limitations in training, programming sustainability, funding, ability to connect to rural areas, and retention of qualified personnel. A pilot study was conducted to assess the effectiveness of short lessons designed for families of deaf and hard of hearing infants and toddlers. The initial findings will share that through the experience of eight weekly video conferencing sessions with Deaf language mentors, we show an immediate shift in caregivers’ attitudes as they discover and develop sign language skills, with the goal to reach proficiency. This workshop will display tools and strategies that ASL Connect offers parents of DHH children to maximize their language proficiency and family engagement via telepractice. Participants will be able to identify connections between research on language acquisition and early visual communication strategies presented in ASL Connect videos Participants will be able to articulate the resources offered by the larger ASL Connect project and ASL Connect: Families in particular. Participants will evaluate the website components and prepare feedback for the ASL Connect team.

Principal investigators

Priorities addressed


Ph.D in Sign Language Education at Gallaudet University: A Viability Study

ID: 3942
Status: Completed
Start date: September 2019
End Date: July 2020

Description

Gallaudet University is proposed to be the home to the world’s first Ph.D. in Sign Language Education program situated in the emerging discipline of sign language pedagogy. There is a need for qualified sign language instructors and leaders at all levels of education. Gallaudet University’s New Program Review requires a proposal to pass through series of stages. This study focused on the viability component of the overall feasibility study in Stage 2. The purpose of the study is to analyze the viability of the proposal by looking into the value, need, and interest for the proposed program. The main research questions that guided this study are: “do current and past graduates of a sign language master degree program value and see a professional need for a Ph.D. in Sign Language Education program at Gallaudet University?” and “are current and past graduates of a sign language master degree program interested in pursuing a Ph.D. in Sign Language Education at Gallaudet University?”. A quantitative approach utilizing the survey methodology was developed and administered to 280 prospective students. The survey collected data from 114 participants who completed the survey in its entirety. The sample group consisted of 24 current graduates and 90 past graduates of the Master in Sign Language Education program. This study is important in terms of setting the stage for elevating the long-awaited discipline of sign language pedagogy in line with other world language disciplines. A major finding revealed by this study has shown that current and past graduates of a sign language master degree program value and see a professional need for a Ph.D. in Sign Language Education. An overwhelming majority of the respondents indicated that such program should be implemented at Gallaudet University. Overall the prospective students are interested in pursuing a Ph.D. in Sign Language Education at Gallaudet University, especially within 10 years.

Principal investigators

Priorities addressed


ROBINSON, OCTAVIAN

ID: 3990
Status: Completed
Start date: October 2019
End Date: July 2020

Description

product only

Principal investigators

Additional investigators

Priorities addressed


ASSESSMENT, WHAT'S THAT?

ID: 3970
Status: Completed
Start date: August 2020
End Date: August 2020

Description

For this virtual workshop, the participants will recognize the importance of ASL assessment by illustrate areas of language proficiency for beginning level of ASL course to create a simple assessment tool. The participants will then view the videos, discuss their assessment of each video, and then explain the rationale for their assessment. Next, there will be a question and answer discussion. The goal of this workshop is for the participants to understand how to assess students’ ASL skills using rubrics and prepares to use rubrics in their classrooms.

Principal investigators

Priorities addressed


Ph.D. in Sign Language Studies at Gallaudet University: A Feasibility Study

ID: 3693
Status: Ongoing
Start date: May 2019
End Date: May 2020

Description

American Sign Language (ASL) has a heavy presence in the United States and Canada. Its use is growing at a rapid pace, and can be seen in multiple media outlets and social media platforms today throughout the world. According to a report written by Goldberg, Looney & Lusin (2015) for the Modern Language Association (MLA), ASL is the 3rd most studied language in the U.S. behind Spanish and French in higher education. Popular world language courses such as German, Chinese and Arabic trails behind. To illustrate this rapid growth and demand for ASL in higher education institutions, ASL has an upward trajectory of a 19% increase in a mere 4 years between 2009-2013 (Goldberg et al., 2015). Though the MLA report focuses primarily on higher education, the upward trend is also true of primary and secondary schools across the United States. While studies have shown a strong growth of ASL courses, a growing body of literature now suggests with this success also comes a challenge in hiring qualified ASL academics with advanced or terminal degrees to fill faculty or leadership roles. At the time of writing there are only two graduate programs from two higher education institutions in the U.S. awarding degrees in sign language pedagogy in the world, and no Ph.D. programs to prepare its graduates to assume faculty or leadership roles. Apart from the two sign language pedagogy programs, there are many programs that offer the study of ASL such as Interpreting, which is an entirely different field often misconstrued to be an eligibility for ASL positions (Harris & Thibodeau, 2016). Consequently individuals with varying backgrounds, experiences and qualifications often hold faculty and leadership roles. With the ever-growing 200+ ASL programs at all sectors of education across the U.S., this presents us with a challenge. Presented with a challenge, and an opportunity. This study asks, is it feasible to build a Ph.D. in Sign Language Studies degree program at Gallaudet University?

Principal investigators

Priorities addressed

Products

Goldberg, G., Looney, D., Lusin, N. (2015, February). Enrollments in languages other than English in United States institutions of higher education, Fall 2013. Retrieved from mla.org/content/download/31180/1452509/EMB_enrllmnts_nonEngl_2013.pdf Harris, R. L., Thibodeau, R. (2016). Sign language teaching: Training. In P. Boudreault & G. Gertz (Eds.), The Deaf Studies Encyclopedia. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications


Scholarship and creative activity

2012

Harris, R. L. & Jackerson, J. L. (2011, November). Academic language development: The crucial foundation for academic success. Presented at the ASL Roundtable Conference, Tucson, AZ.

Harris, R. L. (2012, May). ASL V: Advanced ASL. Presented at Austin Community College, Austin, TX.

Harris, R. L. (2011, November). Academic language development: The crucial foundation for academic success. New Mexico school for the Deaf in-service training, Santa Fe, NM.

Harris, R. L. (2012, March). Preserve, protect and promote ASL: What professionals in the ASL community can do. Presented at ASLFest!, Austin, TX.

Harris, R. L. (2011, October). Advancing linguistic and cognitive skills in Deaf children using extended discourse. Presented at the Department of Linguistics, University of Texas, Austin, TX.

Harris, R. L. (2012, March). Learning ASL: Family and friends. Presented at the University of Northern Colorado, Greeley, CO.

Harris, R. L. (2012). With this book, monolingualism is curable. Journal of Deaf Studies and Deaf Education, 17(1), 138.

Harris, R. L. (2012, April). Describing characteristics of people in American Sign Language. Presented at Sam Houston State University, Huntsville, TX.

Harris, R. L. (2011, October). Academic language development: The crucial foundation for academic success. Presented at the Texas School for the Deaf, Austin, TX.

Harris, R. L. & Jackerson, J. L. (2011, November). Academic language development: The crucial foundation for academic success. Presented for in-service training at Arizona State Schools for the Deaf and Blind, Tucson, AZ.

Harris, R. L. & Jackerson, J. L. (2011, November). Academic language development: The crucial foundation for academic success. Presented at Phoenix Day School for the Deaf, Phoenix, AZ.

2013

Harris, R. L. (2013, January). Online and hybrid pedagogical techniques. Departmental retreat proceedings, Gallaudet University, Washington, DC.

Harris, R. L. (2013, August). A taste of ASL in academic settings. Presented at Graduate Student Orientation, Gallaudet University, Washington, DC.

Harris, R. L. (2013, March). Fingerspelling strategies. Presented at the National American Sign Language and English Bilingual Early Childhood Education Summit, Austin, TX.

Harris, R. L. (2013, August). ASL rubric calibration. Presented at the University faculty development meeting, Gallaudet University, Washington, DC.

Harris, R. L. (2013, March). Technology and ASL teaching: Friend or foe? Presented at the conference for Austin ASL Professionals, Austin, TX.

Harris, R. L. (2013, February). How humanity benefits from Deaf people and American Sign Language: A deaf-gain framework. Presented at Sam Houston State University, Huntsville, TX.

2015

Moore, J., & Harris, R. (2015). Historical and narrative study of lives. In R. Harris & F. Williams (Eds.), Research and evaluation in education and psychology, ASL Version [Video]. Austin, TX: ASLChoice.

Oates, J. A., & Harris, R. L. (2015). Literature review and focusing the research. In R. Harris & F. Williams (Eds.), Research and evaluation in education and psychology, ASL Version [Video]. Austin, TX: ASLChoice

Harris, R. L. (2015, July). The future of ASL: Reflect, celebrate & dream. Presented at the meeting of the ASL Teachers Association, Minneapolis, MN.

Harris, R. L., & Loeffler, S. C. (2015). Seizing academic power: Creating Deaf counter narratives. Journal of ASL and Literature, 5.

Harris, R. L. (2015). An introduction to research. In R. Harris & F. Williams (Eds.), Research and evaluation in education and psychology, ASL Version [Video]. Austin, TX: ASLChoice.

Harris, R. L., & Hottle, K. (2015). Single-case research. In R. Harris & F. Williams (Eds.), Research and evaluation in education and psychology, ASL Version [Video]. Austin, TX: ASLChoice.

Harris, R. L. (2015). What is research? In R. Harris & F. Williams (Eds.), Research and evaluation in education and psychology, ASL Version [Video]. Austin, TX: ASLChoice.

2017

Kushalnagar, P., Harris, R., Paludneviciene, R., & Hoglind, T. (2017). Protocol for Cultural Adaptation and Linguistic Validation of Health Information National Trends Survey in American Sign Language (HINTS-ASL). Journal of Medical Internet Research Protocols. doi:10.2196/jmir.8067 .

Harris, R., Kushalnagar, P., & Paludneviciene, R. (2017). Open-Ended Cognitive Interview Approach: Rethinking the Gold Standards for Translating Health Measures to ASL. Paper presented at the second Symposium on Signed Language Interpretation and Translation Research. Washington, DC.

Harris, R. L. (2017). ASL in academic settings: Language features. ASLized!. Retrieved from http://aslized.org/journal/academicasl/

Bryant, R., Gelineau, L., Shannon, T. & Harris, R. (2017, June 27). TRUE+WAY ASL: A revolutionary digital curriculum. American Sign Language Teachers Association conference, Salt Lake City, Utah.

Harris, R. (2017, June 30). The evolution of graduate sign language teacher preparation programs. Presented at the American Sign Language Teachers Association, National Biennial Conference, Salt Lake City, Utah.

2019

Gelineau, L. & Harris, R. (2019, January 12). TRUE+WAY ASL curriculum training. Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX.

Harris, R. L. (2018, November 14). Deaf culture book writing process and Deaf identities. Austin Community College, Austin, TX.

Harris, R. (2019, May 2-3). TRUE+WAY ASL curriculum training. Seattle, Washington.

Sheneman, N., Harris, R., Swindle, B. (2019). A discussion on translation process for JASLL. St. Paul, MN: CATIE Center. Retrieved from grad2cert.org/translation-discussion-jasll/

Harris, R. (2019, March 9). TRUE+WAY ASL curriculum training. Boise State University, Boise, ID.

Harris, R. (2018). Transforming my teaching through action research. Journal of American Sign Languages and Literatures.

Andrews, J. F., Leigh, I. W. & Harris, R. L. (2018). Deaf culture: Exploring deaf communities in the United States. San Diego, CA: Plural Publishing.

Harris, R. & Shannon, T. (2019, July 3). TRUE+WAY ASL curriculum shareshop. ASL Teachers Association Biannual National Conference, San Diego, CA.

Harris, R. L. (2018, October 12). Academic language development: The crucial foundation for academic success. Oregon School for the Deaf, Salem, Oregon.

Harris, R. L. (2018, October 12). Academic language development: The crucial foundation for academic success. Washington School for the Deaf, Vancouver, Washington.

Gelineau, L., Harris, R., & Shannon, T. (2019, June 30). TRUE+WAY ASL curriculum training. ASL Teachers Association Biannual National Conference, San Diego, CA.

Burcham, P. & Harris, R. (2017, July 15). The ASL and interpreting fields: Linguistic and cultural convergence. Deaf Interpreter Conference II, Villanova, Pennsylvania.

Harris, R. L. (2018, October 12 – 13). The five principles of language assessment: PRVAB-izing your assessment tools. Oregon ASL Teachers Association (OR-ASLTA), Portland, Oregon.

Bryant, R., Gelineau, L., Shannon, T. & Harris, R. (2018). TRUE+WAY ASL: Levels 3 and 4, Teacher and Student Workbook. Austin, TX: Purple Moontower, LLC.

Kurz, C., Kurz, K. & Harris, R. (2018). Effectively interpreting the content areas utilizing academic language strategies. In T. Holcomb & D. Smith (Eds.), Deaf Eyes on Interpreting. Washington, DC: Gallaudet Press.

2015

Williams, F. (2015, September). Diversity tru-biz include. Presented at the Florida American Sign Language Conference, Daytona Beach, FL.

Gray, L., & Williams, F. (2014, November). Diversity tru-biz include. Presented at the Maryland American Sign Language Conference, McDaniel College, Westminster, MD.

Gray, L., & Williams, F. (2015, June). Diversity tru-biz include. Presented at the American Sign Language Conference, Bloomington, MN.

2017

Bauman, H-D. & Murray, J.J. (2017). Sign Language. In Garcia. O, Flores, N & Spotti, M. (Eds.) Oxford Handbook of Language and Society. Oxford University Press.