Government and Public Affairs

The Government and Public Affairs program emphasizes the links between research, learning, and activism. Much of the research effort by both faculty and students focuses on issues such as international and domestic human rights and influencing political processes, often integrating the areas of law, politics, and organizational behavior.


Analysis of Eye Gazes and Attention Management in a Preschool Class

ID: 3466
Status: Completed
Start date: March 2016

Description

Following a new paradigm that the issue of sustained attention observed among young deaf students is due to limited exposure to language, this study attempts to document quantitatively the attention behavior during a book-reading lesson in a preschool class where everyone has full access to communication.

Principal investigators

Additional investigators

Priorities addressed

Products

Kuntze, M., & Schott, L. (2017, February). Analysis of eye gazes and attention maintenance in a preschool class. Paper presented at Association of Collegiate Educators of the Deaf and Hard of Hearing Conference, San Antonio, TX.


Higher Education Institutional Responses to COVID-19

ID: 4004
Status: Ongoing
Start date: March 2020
End Date: December 2020

Description

Across the globe, communities are grappling with the COVID-19 pandemic. The implications of this evolving public health crisis include responses from individuals as well as public and private institutions. While individual responses are imperative (i.e., social distancing), organizational level responses (i.e., closing office spaces, allowing remote work, etc.) are a fundamental part of allowing individuals to respond. In the current COVID-19 crisis, the organizational-level responses from anchor institutions of democracy, such as colleges and universities (Dexter and Blankenberg 2016; Holden and Tryhorn 2013), play an exceptionally pivotal role in supporting or preventing individuals and communities from being responsive. Research into how these institutions respond is imperative, both for immediate guidance and for developing best practices over the long term. This study seeks to analyze organizational responses through content analysis of institutional emails sent to faculty, staff, and students in higher education settings. This project will use emails as the primary form of data for analysis. Emails reflect a core artifact of organizational culture as established in public administration literature (Dolamore, 2019; Gooden, 2014; Testa and Sipe, 2013). Organizational culture encompasses the structural (i.e., space, policies, logos, etc.) and personal (i.e., leadership, socialization, learning) elements of an organization that influence individual behavior through the collective impact of each element (Chao and Moon 2005; Shafritz and Ott 1992). As a result, this project will explore the representations of various organizational culture domains (i.e., discourse, policies, leadership behavior) through the content of the email artifacts.

Principal investigators

Additional investigators

Priorities addressed

Products

Dolamore, S., Lovell, D., Collins, H., and Kline, A. (2020). The Role of Empathy in Organizational Communication During Times of Crisis. Administrative Theory & Praxis. 10.1080/10841806.2020.1830661


How We Rise-Social Networks in Charlotte: Policy Choices, Policy Opportunities

ID: 3986
Status: Ongoing
Start date: August 2020
End Date: December 2020

Description

Charlotte, NC is a city rich with opportunities; but those opportunities are not equitably shared. In 2014, Charlotte ranked 50th out of 50 in a ranking of cities for upward mobility. Now the city aspires to be a horizon community, one where all can rise. Social networks, providing access to support, information, power, and resources, are a critical and often neglected element of opportunity structures. Social capital matters for mobility. We analyzed over 10,000 interpersonal network connections in the city, drawing on rich data from 177 representative residents of Charlotte. These networks were then evaluated for size (i.e. number of people), breadth (i.e. range of connection types, such as familial or professional), and strength (i.e. the value of connection as a source of assistance). We compared social networks by demographic groups, especially race, income, and gender. In particular, we assessed networks in terms of their value for access to opportunities and resources in three domains: jobs, education, and housing.

Principal investigators

Priorities addressed

Funding sources

Products

Busette, C.M., Farrow-Chestnut, T., Reeves R.V., Frimpong, K &Sun, H. (2020.09.22), "Social Networks in Charlotte: Policy Choices, Policy Opportunities." The Brookings Institution Report


Scholarship and creative activity

2018

Koulidobrova, E., Kuntze, M., & Dostal, H. (2018). If you use ASL, should you study ESL? Limitations of a modality-b(i)ased policy. Language 94(4).

2015

O'Brien, C. Kroner, C., & Placier, P. (2015). Deaf culture and academic culture: Cultivating dialogue across cultural boundaries. Journal of Diversity in Higher Education, 8(2), 104-119.

O'Brien, C., & Brooks, J. (2015). Deaf culture and education: Toward a culturally relevant leadership. In A. Normore & K. Esposito (Eds.), Inclusive practices for special populations in urban settings: The moral imperative for social justice leadership. Charlotte, NC: Information Age Publishing.

O'Brien, C., & Placier, P. (2015). Deaf culture and school culture in a residential school for the Deaf: "Can do" versus "can't do". Journal of Equity and Excellence, 48(2), 320-338.